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Solving petty arguments in the classroom?

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by hana54, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. hana54

    hana54 New commenter

    I met my new class today and they seem like a fantastic bunch. However, I've noticed a few petty arguments breaking out between children, for example over pencils or accusing each other of pushing them. Leads to a 'no he did it, no its her fault' disagreement... I'm sure you all know the sort! I was just wondering how others dealt with this? I find it really difficult to know what to say/do in these situations because on one hand I don't want to disrupt the lesson by drawing attention to something so petty but on the other hand I know something has to be done! Any ideas?
     
  2. hana54

    hana54 New commenter

    I met my new class today and they seem like a fantastic bunch. However, I've noticed a few petty arguments breaking out between children, for example over pencils or accusing each other of pushing them. Leads to a 'no he did it, no its her fault' disagreement... I'm sure you all know the sort! I was just wondering how others dealt with this? I find it really difficult to know what to say/do in these situations because on one hand I don't want to disrupt the lesson by drawing attention to something so petty but on the other hand I know something has to be done! Any ideas?
     
  3. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    In Secondary, where petty arguments still seem to proliferate, it works really well to show mock/real concern for the problem and to tell the pupils that we really need to get to the bottom of the issue so for all parties to see you at break or lunch-time to get things sorted.
    It's amazing how quickly they settle their differences in the lesson in order not to lose any break time!
     
  4. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    I say something generic, eg. "I don't want to see anyone snatching" or "Everyone should be keeping their hands to themselves". It's important not to take sides! Another tactic is to ask both children to move away from each other (asking just one looks like you're blaming that one), or saying that *insert appropriate sanction here* will happen if either of them mentions the disagreement again.
     

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