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Solubility of halogens in organic solvents.

Discussion in 'Science' started by blazer, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    I am putting together a new C2 scheme of work and would like to demonstrate halogen reactivity to my students. We don't have a VI form and so don't have access to lots of special chemicals. We also don't have any fume cupboards.

    However I know that I could produce small amounts of Chlorine water quite easily by generating chlorine using hypochlorite and bubbling it through water before the lesson starts.

    I could then use that to generate bromine from a bromide solution and iodine from an iodide.

    We don't have any hexane or carbon tetrachloride to show the solubility. Would I be able to do this by using small quantities of lighter fluid (petrol)?

    Afterwards any solvents and dissolved halogens could be disposed of after school by taking them outside and burning them off.
     
  2. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    I am putting together a new C2 scheme of work and would like to demonstrate halogen reactivity to my students. We don't have a VI form and so don't have access to lots of special chemicals. We also don't have any fume cupboards.

    However I know that I could produce small amounts of Chlorine water quite easily by generating chlorine using hypochlorite and bubbling it through water before the lesson starts.

    I could then use that to generate bromine from a bromide solution and iodine from an iodide.

    We don't have any hexane or carbon tetrachloride to show the solubility. Would I be able to do this by using small quantities of lighter fluid (petrol)?

    Afterwards any solvents and dissolved halogens could be disposed of after school by taking them outside and burning them off.
     
  3. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Might work, although I suspect lighter fluid might be too volatile and evaporate too quickly.
    White spirit might be an alternative to hexane.
    Conc sulphuric and KBr will give you an alternative route to some Br2 (aq)
    Don't like your new avatar,
    P
     
  4. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Which avatar can you see? I changed back to my John Wayne Ice hockey one this morning. I got fed up of looking at Goves face!
     
  5. Blazer, you need to look at your Hazcards (I am not sure what is in lighter fluid) or contact CLEAPSS for advice - assuming you are in a member school. If there is any dought, don't use.
    Why can't you purchase some hexane, most suppliers would have got it to you for after half term? .
     
  6. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Surely hexane is just as hazardous as lighter fluid (probably more so as petrol is a longer chain alkane mixture). Plus buying and storing hexane requires following regs. Buying a can of lighter fluid from the newsagent opposite school and then taking it home again afterwards must be a lot less faff. I will have to do some trials. Phlogiston's suggestion of white spirit may get me out of trouble although it will be more difficult to dispose of.
     
  7. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    I can still see Mr G!
    I would have thought that the volume of white spirit (or indeed any other hydrocarbon) was such that it could be poured onto mineral wool and burnt outside after the students have gone home. (or burnt in a spirit burner).
    Regs about hexane aren't that onerous. Less so than ethanol.
    P
     

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