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So, you don't think you will ever have an allegation made against you, eh?

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by binaryhex, Jul 3, 2017.

  1. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-48703955

    Overworked? Stroke more likely. Most teachers are worked like a donkey. Most teachers therefore more likely to have a stroke.

    Why embark on a career where your life is at risk?
     
    Shedman and pepper5 like this.
  2. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    Shedman and agathamorse like this.
  3. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    Where does it say that doesn't include work done at home?
     
  4. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    Class sizes in secondary schools are huge. They've been getting bigger and bigger, with a wider range of abilities in each class. As a teacher, managing this is a nightmare, especially in practical subjects, where pupils are unlikely to get more than a minute of teacher time, even if they are really struggling. And what a massive surprise - this leads to huge behaviour problems in classes, teachers at their wits end and senior managers hiding more and more as they can't offer solutions. It's a terrible, stressful situation to be in every hour, every day, every month. Don't teach unless you think you can deal with this.

    https://www.tes.com/news/secondary-school-class-sizes-rise-fourth-year
     
  5. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

  6. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    Shedman, pepper5 and agathamorse like this.
  7. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

    Still thinking of a teaching career, making a difference?

    New teachers still quickly throwing the towel in, and being left with huge debts, a broken career and shattered self-confidence:

    https://www.tes.com/news/one-three-teachers-leaves-within-five-years

    Food banks, casual contracts and suicidal thoughts for some teachers now:

    https://www.tes.com/news/casual-fe-staff-struggling-make-ends-meet-says-ucu

    https://www.tes.com/news/casual-work-education-i-even-contemplated-suicide

    Staff on strike over pay:

    https://www.tes.com/news/nottingham-college-staff-strike-over-pay

    Little support now during training years for teachers, don't believe the hype and promises:

    https://www.tes.com/news/schools-struggle-find-time-mentor-nqts
     
    Shedman, pepper5 and agathamorse like this.
  8. binaryhex

    binaryhex Lead commenter

  9. harpplayer

    harpplayer New commenter

    Thanks. Decided against now!
     
  10. harpplayer

    harpplayer New commenter

    I should clarify. I love teaching. It’s a rewarding job, that gives me flexibility, satisfaction and a really great lifestyle. I’ve also managed to build up a network of private students now from uber-wealthy families (£80 an hour) so am earning serious serious money. Not in the UK, silly! I have been in Dubai for coming up to five years now.

    Like most, it went A Levels, Uni, PGCE, NQT, wanted to change the world so worked in a challenging i.e. normal academy, then meltdown after an allegation that took three months to sort out and left me shattered. That was a killer. I finished my NQT year, swore I’d never work in a UK school again, started applying to Dubai schools simply because I had a few friends there and the rest is history.

    Looking back, UK schools are a joke but if you can get through the NQT year, if no stupid 14 year old girl you tried to help doesn’t accuse you of anything, if you can survive the workload without losing your mental health, and if you don’t mind being poor all the time and being looked on as doing a career because you couldn’t get a proper job, you can thrive in teaching. But you will need to work abroad to do so. Think of UK teaching training as SAS training for schools - can you survive?

    I’ll never in a zillion years work in a UK school again.
     

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