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Snoring

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Lilyofthefield, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Mr L is doing my ed in. It's either got very much worse in the last two years or it's because I no longer take the antidepressants that used to knock me out flat. I certainly became more aware of it when I was awake a lot in the night with hot flushes, and I'm amazed he gets any rest at all. He also stops breathing completely for up to ten seconds, which is a bit alarming. I usually shove him if I notice and he starts again - presumably he starts again anyway or he would be errrr.... dead :)
    It wakes us both up several times a night. He's tired a lot suring the day but keeps saying it's because he's so busy at work. He doesn't have any risk factors like weight problems or smoking. He won't see a doctor ("no wonder the NHS is broke") so I put it to him this morning that I should sort out the spare room and move in there during the week because I am so unrested in the morning and tired at work. It got roughly the same reception as if I'd suggested I move into the spare room because this marriage is over.
    A colleague has suggested a nasal spray - Beconase or similar - and I have one i haven;t opened yet. I think he might be persuaded to try that. Has anyone had any luck with it?
     
  2. Mr L is doing my ed in. It's either got very much worse in the last two years or it's because I no longer take the antidepressants that used to knock me out flat. I certainly became more aware of it when I was awake a lot in the night with hot flushes, and I'm amazed he gets any rest at all. He also stops breathing completely for up to ten seconds, which is a bit alarming. I usually shove him if I notice and he starts again - presumably he starts again anyway or he would be errrr.... dead :)
    It wakes us both up several times a night. He's tired a lot suring the day but keeps saying it's because he's so busy at work. He doesn't have any risk factors like weight problems or smoking. He won't see a doctor ("no wonder the NHS is broke") so I put it to him this morning that I should sort out the spare room and move in there during the week because I am so unrested in the morning and tired at work. It got roughly the same reception as if I'd suggested I move into the spare room because this marriage is over.
    A colleague has suggested a nasal spray - Beconase or similar - and I have one i haven;t opened yet. I think he might be persuaded to try that. Has anyone had any luck with it?
     
  3. Shifter

    Shifter New commenter

    Doc Shifter says it sounds like Sleep Apnoia - but check back to an earlier post, I suggested one of those rings that slip on the pinky finger.
    Apparantly in works in my case - do a google search or look back on TES
     
  4. bbibbler

    bbibbler New commenter

    Maybe another use for the shotgun?
     
  5. Shifter

    Shifter New commenter

    Looks like I'm in the market for a speel-chucker
     
  6. He's wrong. Maybe completely and entirely wrong. If he stops breathing during the night it's definitely a case for the doc to investigate sleep apnoea.
    He can try the nasal spray and a pharmacist may have other suggestions, but in the end he's got an issue which may be affecting his heart. How long since he's been for a checkup?
    His work may be tiring, but he'd cops a lot better if he had a good night's sleep, every single night.
    (I remember friends of ours where both were terrible snorers. Eventually they had 2 beautiful bedrooms. Each night they'd spend some time together snuggling in her bed , then he always went to his own bed.)
     
  7. er, that would be cope a lot better
     
  8. marshypops

    marshypops New commenter

    I'm very sure it is sleep apnoia. He won't sleep well at night because his body will wake him up every time he stops breathing, does he nod off a bit in the afternoon too?
    Get him to the GP (using the shotgun if necessary).

     
  9. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Lead commenter

    It certainly sounds like a case of sleep apnoea and he should be urged to go to his GP. They may send him to a sleep lab to see exactly what is going on, and could eventually fit him with a contraption to regulate the pressure passing through his respiratory system, thus remedying the problem. To leave things be will put him at risk of high blood pressure, heart problems etc. It is really worth your while persevering and pestering him to take the next step - I would.
     
  10. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Lead commenter

    I meant to add that you'd be wasting both time and money on nasal sprays where heavy duty snoring of that nature is taking place.
     
  11. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Shifter, I'm definitely going to invest in one of those rings.
    Was informed by husband at weekend that my snoring is apparently so loud he could hear it downstairs...
    Am mortified. [​IMG]

     
  12. Shifter

    Shifter New commenter

    Worth the cash
     
  13. Why is it always the woman who has to move out? We have a lovely bed and I would be loathe to move out, my husband does snore and like you Lily I was far more aware of it when I was waking ten times a night with a hot flush!
    Both my sisters rarely wake up in the morning next to their husband, but it is they who got out of the cosy bed and moved next door.
     
  14. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I'm very ashamed to say that I'm the snorer and mr inky the mover. We start most night spearate and end most of them together. In my defence, mr inky is a terrible sleeper in his own right.
     
  15. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    separate
     
  16. Snoring... oh that visitor who moves in during one's fourth decade!
    I have limited tolerance of Mr H's snoring, which is always worse on a Friday or if he's been out with the lads from work. On such occasions the order of the Royal Boot is given to move up to the loft conversion.
    On a more serious note, if the candidate is having apnoea, it can be quite dangerous. The trouble is, that having seen those Cpap machines, which convert you or your spouse into a cross between an elephant and something from "Alien", the only other option would appear to be a good lawyer to file the divorce papers.
    I gather the other option is to sew something prickly into the back of any garment worn in bed, so that the snorer cannot sleep on their backs, which is always the worst position for amplifying snoring. Haven't heard of the other suggestion.
     
  17. voodoo child

    voodoo child New commenter

    I'm another victim of the dreaded snorer from hell partner Mr. VC. Do find that ear plugs help and the best ones are the ones they sell for travel with two semi circular discs (can get them on the travel bits rack in the supermarket). I do spend time telling Mr. VC to roll over as he is snoring and he usually argues that he was wide awake and certainly is not snoring. Some days I'm exhausted from it and today is one of those days. [​IMG] I usually get up to go to the loo and wake him up enough for him to roll over.
     
  18. the evil tokoloshe

    the evil tokoloshe New commenter

    Snoring's one thing, has anyone got anything to stop a hyperactive toddler running around like a dervish on a wooden floor in the flat upstairs? I have no idea how his mother doesn't get *** off with it. Suggestions on a postcard please.....I actually woke myself up snoring the other day, probably not a good thing but generally its the Acme Thunderer that wakes me up at ungodly hours.
     
  19. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Sh*te. Am I the only female snorer?
    Doubly mortified now. [​IMG]
     
  20. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    No - shhhh! [​IMG]
     

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