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slightly peeved...

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by marceemarcee, Mar 22, 2012.


  1. I had an interview for a GTP post about 3 weeks ago (school, not uni)
    and recieved a message yesterday saying I didn't get it. When I phoned
    back for feedback, I was told that really, I had done very well and that
    I had a lot of potential and that they were sure I'd get a job
    somewhere. When I kept probing for advice for another interview, I was
    told that they didn't really have any and that I should just do what I did
    with them. When asking yet further, I was told that the candidate
    selected (a past pupil, for the record) had been selected as their
    department currently consists of only male staff and they thought it
    would be good to have a female. Nepotism or paranoia (on my part)? Or letting me down gently (I'd prefer not to have been!)?
    So
    annoyed, as I had ALOT of expense and traveling for the interview and
    if they knew that I had no chance regardless of how good or bad I would
    have been, I wish they'd never invited me to interview. That said,
    looked like a great school and great place to work!

    Sorry, needed to vent! Thoughts?
     

  2. I had an interview for a GTP post about 3 weeks ago (school, not uni)
    and recieved a message yesterday saying I didn't get it. When I phoned
    back for feedback, I was told that really, I had done very well and that
    I had a lot of potential and that they were sure I'd get a job
    somewhere. When I kept probing for advice for another interview, I was
    told that they didn't really have any and that I should just do what I did
    with them. When asking yet further, I was told that the candidate
    selected (a past pupil, for the record) had been selected as their
    department currently consists of only male staff and they thought it
    would be good to have a female. Nepotism or paranoia (on my part)? Or letting me down gently (I'd prefer not to have been!)?
    So
    annoyed, as I had ALOT of expense and traveling for the interview and
    if they knew that I had no chance regardless of how good or bad I would
    have been, I wish they'd never invited me to interview. That said,
    looked like a great school and great place to work!

    Sorry, needed to vent! Thoughts?
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Neither nepotism nor paranoia, but illegal. You have been discriminated against on the basis of gender; this is unlawful discrimination.
    Are you a member of a union? If so, contact them immediately. If not, CAB or ACAS.
    http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/detail?itemId=1073792193&type=RESOURCES

    Discrimination during the recruitment process
    It is important to avoid discrimination during the recruitment process. This not only is a legal requirement, but also gives you the best chance of getting the right person for the job.
    Remember that job applicants - ie people you don't actually employ - might be able to make an employment tribunal claim against you if they believe you didn't select them for a job because you discriminated against them unlawfully.

    See that bit in bold? That's what has happened to you.
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The next seminar Win That Teaching Job is Saturday 24th March. www.tesweekendworkshop95.eventbrite.com
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk
     
  4. Thanks for the info, Theo. I was fairly aware that it was illegal and still am in some form of disbelief that this was actually said to me by a teacher in a very highly-regarded school. You would think they'd have a little more wit!
    It's not so much the female thing that has annoyed me, partly becuase I'm not sure that that was an actual reason but just something to fob me off with, hence my disbelief, but perhaps the fact that I believe that I was never in the running for that job becuase of the past pupil's connection to the place.
    Do you know if this kind of practice (i.e. creating a position for someone in particular) is common for GTP posts? Are schools required to advertise the post regardless?

    Cheers.
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Schools normally have only to advertise Head and Deputy posts - unless there's a Governing Body policy or a Local Authority policy that says that they must.
    Yes, you are right - feedback is generally (not always, but generally) pretty useless.
    Better luck next time, is all that I can say.
    (But I would still protest about being told this . . . write to Chair of Governors maybe?)
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The next seminar Win That Teaching Job is Saturday 24th March. www.tesweekendworkshop95.eventbrite.com
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk
     
  6. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    In my experience a lot of GTP candidates begin through working voluntarily in the school or starting as a Teaching assistant. This gets your foot in the door and allows an extended interview. GTP is highly competitive and as schools have to at least part fund the post the availability depends upon so many local factors-the issue you have raised is not to do with the advertising of posts but the fair recruitment procedure that every employer has to follow. Schools (despite what heads think) are not exempt.
     

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