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Sixth form class size

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by atics, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. What class size do you think is the maximum ideal for an A-level maths class?
    I'm trying to think of a number over which I would request an additional teacher so we can split the class into 2.
    My initial thought is that 16 is probably a good maximum. 17 could be split into a 9 and an 8.
     
  2. What class size do you think is the maximum ideal for an A-level maths class?
    I'm trying to think of a number over which I would request an additional teacher so we can split the class into 2.
    My initial thought is that 16 is probably a good maximum. 17 could be split into a 9 and an 8.
     
  3. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    We've started the year with 22, though through group changes and subject changes, it's now down to 18. This despite changing from 2 groups to 3 groups, it's driven by how many want to do Mechanics or Statistics.
     
  4. briceanus

    briceanus New commenter

    Our SMT will only consider a second (or third) group when numbers exceed 32 !!!
    We currently have 16 in one group, 21 in another and 19 in another.
    Bric
     
  5. The Romans said twelve. More than twelve people, and you can't have a conversation round the table.


     
  6. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    And this is based on your extensive knowledge and experience of teaching where exactly?
     
  7. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    I don't teach A-Level but IB. I also teach in the private sector where class sizes are governed more by what is ideal ( always subjective ) rather than financial requirements.
    In my experience, the ideal class size is between 6 to 10 students.
     
  8. Sorry, it's nine. The Romans sat three people at each side of the table, but one side was left clear.



     
  9. I don't think it was intended as practical advice for the classroom. It was just a comment. Why are you so hostile?
     
  10. pwc9000

    pwc9000 New commenter

    Ditto
     
  11. googolplex

    googolplex Occasional commenter

    We have previously had AS sets of up to 26. The school were criticised by ofsted for this. Hence, they've had to be careful, but we still have 3 AS classes stretching into the low 20s...
    AS is exceptionally hard work with this number of students, and I rely alot on students contacting me out of lessons in order to get the individual attention they need.
    Last year, I had an A2 class with 19 in it. That made marking a set of past papers a real marathon, except in a tick and flick capacity.
     
  12. At the college I teach at no A Level class is allowed to be over 24 students, otherwise it gets split.
     
  13. So how much do you offer the 25th student to sign up?
     
  14. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    Harsh.
     
  15. It wasn't a particularly intelligent comment.
    The Romans used to sit nine at table. However I didn't get that information from being a Roman.



     
  16. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Feel like playing again bgy1mm?
    The comment would be harsh taken out of context. However bgy1mm is not a teacher and other than being in a classroom as a student has no idea about teaching.
     
  17. GoldMaths

    GoldMaths New commenter

    I have two sets 28 and 25 - they was bigger at the start of the year. Two reasons for size one is blocking, we are joint sixth form other I suspect is money bigger classes more funding (if the pass).
     
  18. You mean "schoolmaster". The use of "teacher" for "schoolmaster" is now established and we can't reasonably object to it, but the words originally meant rather different things. Your assertion that non-schoolmasters know nothing about teaching is not correct.



     
  19. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    I am writing about the context now. This isn't a game of semantics. Do you wish to refer to a schoolmaster as a male teacher or do you wish to refer to as a guardian as described in some versions of the bible? Perhaps you prefer some other usage of the term. Either way, the correct usage - in this instance - is the commonly understood one.
    My assertion is that you know nothing about teaching. Read the statement again and you may find that it is a series of propositions. Let us consider them.
    "bgy1mm is not a teacher."
    Well are you or are you not? Gentleman amateurs who occasionally dabble need not apply. Answers on a postcard please.
    "other than being in a classroom as a student has no idea about teaching."
    Hmm. Perhaps not a classic example of a proposition, but it will do as there is a recession going on.
    On the face of it, it is subjective. Yet at its essence it has the simple implication that in order for one to understand teaching, one has to teach.
    Do you, once again, teach?
     
  20. And to teach English literature, one must be novelist?




     

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