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since TES have lost my eco thread ...

Discussion in 'Personal' started by NellyFUF, Sep 24, 2015.

?

Blog or website (bear in mind technical ineptitude though

  1. yes

    2 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. no

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. don't care

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. want to help

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    Somewhere in cyber space is my thread about gardens and green and eco stuff generally - I cannot find it now. Should I go into Wordpress and start a Blog or something? When I was starting out finding out about food forests and insulation I was so happy to find anyone online who had helpful advice or pictures. I should share that right back I think.
     
  2. xena-warrior

    xena-warrior Star commenter

    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your question, unless you haven't tried the search function yet, but I've just been having a look at the most historic threads transferred from Personal on the old site. I remember some of them running to hundreds of posts but most have been trimmed down to between 10 and 20 non-sequential posts.
    I don't understand the point of that.
    If your thread is still there, it's probably only displaying three posts.
     
  3. cosmosinfrance

    cosmosinfrance Star commenter

    The gardening forum, including your eco thread seems to have vanished Nelly. Mind you, it was never easy to find at the best of times.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  4. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Indeed. But it is a shame that some of NellyFuf lovely pictures of her marathon efforts in her garden are now lost.:(
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  5. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    Tubby bear, it was probably not that directly linked to education or teaching and learning - except as an escape plan! Not the best place in cyber world for such a thread! After all, teachers don't like gardening at all do they? And reducing carbon footprints is hardly more important than improving C grades in ICT so that layered smart targets can be met. Or summat.
    I could start a new thread on Retirement or Personal - maybe with the current building work photos and update on the orchard progress. it might help someone feel a bit comforted in this bleak world of layered targets and performance management ...........
     
    cosmosinfrance and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  6. cosmosinfrance

    cosmosinfrance Star commenter

    Do, Nelly. I loved reading about your garden. I would particularly like to read about your orchard progress as I'm about to create one of my own. Can we talk about apple varieties? :)
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  7. Mangleworzle

    Mangleworzle Star commenter

    Your thread s news to me Nelly, though it sounds like I'd have been an avid reader had I found it.

    A website could be a good idea if you have the enthusiasm and are prepared to learn how to do it. Bear in mind though that it becomes a long lonely task in the early stages especially and you won't get replies or feedback in the way your thread probably did. I'm not keen on blogs as don't like the layout and they too often end up as huuuuuge long pages that are impossible to find anything on. People can reply to them, but first they have to find them and that won't happen for a long time - a year or two - in any numbers.
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  8. aspensquiver

    aspensquiver Star commenter

    Gardening as an antidote?! Sounds cool.
     
  9. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Do NellyFuf. I am full of admiration for what you've done. We've got 3/4 acre of ex-orchard and we're so far off reclaiming it from brambles /undergrowth. I did about a 15'square the entire summer! Would love to hera about your latest- and possibly get some tips, if in the future we get any decent amount of time to get on top of it.
    I find gardening is particularly good for venting frustration as a teacher. ;)
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  10. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

  11. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    hmm it loaded one photo but now it says files are too big - so there is one "before" photo
    We tried to plant unusual fruit but had to use internet as - we decided that sticking stuff in the ground quickly 2013 meant we might actually live to see the fruit - both working and no time to find out more - so we have fruit trees from one main grower - Pig's nose Pippinne, Cellini, Court of Wick, , Vicar of Winkfield, Bardsey, I could give a full list - Cambridge Gage, Nottingham Medlar,, about 20 trees in all. We want some Westmorland damsons next. Oulins golden gage, egremont russet, old greengage, golden spire apple, blenheim orange apple, merryweather damson (yum) winter gem apple, sissons of worksop, court of wick apple, george cave apple, chivers delight from Harlow carr, and two old apple trees that were already there, Warwickshire Drooper plum, Doyenne de Comice, pear, Durondeau, Louis Bon of Jersey pears, Halls Giant cobnut, NOttingham cobnut and red filbert hazelnuts. In between these we have vege and spuds and fruit bushes which are productive even if a bit choked with grass and weeds. Better cropping from forest planting than in beds.
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  12. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    We did invest in a mechanical scythe which cost us but is so good for the long meadow grass and all the rubbish that had grown in it. We got rid of brambles and nettles in the garden photo above using a Bosch battery lawnmower. It was great for clearing the land!
     
  13. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    And if we knew where you were we could maybe bring the scythe over!
     
  14. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter

    I enjoyed reading it and seeing the photos.
     
  15. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    That's a good idea. Little point in growing stuff which is available to buy.
    Just watch out as many older varieties do tend to less disease resistant than newer varieties. Any sort of 'Pippin' is good- though we did lose one 'new (10 year old) tree last winter. Blenheim orange are really tasty and do have a small 'orabge ' taste. Quite prolific too. Geoge Cave are large and also good, as are any type of russets, which will keep until March generally. Ours can't be picked till late Oct. We've not had much luck with some of those varieties of pear- most 'new ) ie under 10 years old have yet to show their mettle. Hazelnuts will be wonderful- if the squirrels don't get to them first.;)
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  16. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    We are looking for a Sharslton Pippin as we are near that area. I don't mind if the trees get a bit diseased. I can only deal with so many apples really. It is kind of let go and let nature sort it out. It is a luxury of hobby orcharding!
    Have you got any cherries?
    We really need to plant a windbreak hedge as the orchard is very windy.
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  17. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Never been successful with cherries. :(last one we planted a few years back died the first Winter- and we're not in a 'cold' area, rarely having snow, but usually have quite mild winters. It's probably the clay ground we're on. Having said that my husband's aunt who has the neighbouring garden has a very successful tree, which fruits each year-though they do have to spend a day 'throwing a cotton reel over it to keep the birds off!
     
  18. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    We are clay soil too. Very heavy clay. There are some wild self seeded cherries in the garden but they are not that vigorous. It sounds like your orchard is well on its way.
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  19. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    The 'orchard' is actually mostly an 'ex-orchard' started by my husband's grandfather during the 1920s, so many of the trees are very old-hence the replacements. We have pears, plums, greengages, damsons, HUGE cooking apple trees as well as 'smaller' tress,though still quite large by modern standards! But there's still vast areas to be recovered where brambles are the main 'growth'!;)And as we have father-in-laws garden to care for and spending around 2 and a hald hours a day 'caring' for them there's little time to really get on top of things. the brambles seem to be growing about a foot a day after the recent rains! :mad:
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.
  20. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    You could hire a mechanical scythe for a day? During the winter when the growth is dry.
    We've cleared two gardens now - regular mowing is the way forward rather than heaving out roots. I also used a battery hedge trimmer to clear nettles and brambles - sat on my bottom in the mud clearing a bit at a time. I'm such a weakling! Then you can just mow. I swear by my Bosch battery kit - much easier than electric mowers etc with no chord to deal with and can go anywhere... I cleaned up much of the garden with just a Bosch mower and a rake, no harder than pushing a pushchair. Then the grass just takes over.

    We have a strimmer, a hedge tool, three mowers, plus saws and drills and a sander, all battery operated. A reciprocating saw has made any kind of pruning a doddle. I used to spend hours with a branch saw but my new reciprocating saw just takes seconds.
    Greenworks tools look good now, too.
    Gone on the days when we valiantly set about wildernesses with a blunt pair of scissors and a kitchen knife. You need the right tools and it makes a quick difference. Christmas is coming......
    You do seem to be doing a lot of caring all round!
     
    cosmosinfrance likes this.

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