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Simply: Don't Even Go There

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by happygreenfrog, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Once qualified:
    few perm. jobs, temporary contracts everywhere, spells out of work, rubbish supply work, shocking head teachers with few interpersonall skills, poor parenting, lack of career movement, ridiculously long hours out of school (50+ hour weeks are the norm), demands for paperwork nonsense.
    Undervalued, overworked and unappreciated.
    Avoid teaching at all costs.
     
  2. pretty much sums it up
     
  3. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    And how many jobs with high entrance requirements don't have a slew of negatives? Doctors have insane working hours that can nearly kill them, on top of the blood, pus and urine that they'll encounter.
    Every so often you're in front of a class and you see that they get what you're talking about, that they've genuinely leaped forward with your help. You'll also have the numpties from hell who don't care. Some classes you'll look forward to, others you'll dread. We see human nature at its best and worse since everyone from every background will eventually come to us. Every day is different and in there lies the challenge, you're outnumbered 120 to 1 and you've got to be ready. If you like Chaos and can outwit that many then come to us, but if you expect order and progress then don't.
    Sometimes we'll inspire or sometimes we'll drive them away - we've had an effect, for good or ill. Who else does?
    We're optimists and perfectionists in a job where things will go wrong and compromise is a day to day requirement. As long as you can say at the end of the day "I did my best" there's little else that can be asked of you, no matter what they demand.
    Education has always been a battle you can't win. You either live with it, fight it or get crushed by it.
     
  4. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Blah! Blah! Blah! The difference is a doctor is virtually guaranteed work, the difference is someone with a steady perm job is able to handle the varieties that teaching presents and chooses to stay in the profession.
    The reality is many commit to a teaching career then get left on the shelf after training. Why advise someone to take up teaching who then may not be able to get a job, even worse if they've changed career to do so or have a family to support. The reality is there are few jobs, and those around are mainly of temporary contract. You cannot plan for your life, a family or a home and yet you are expected to sit around and wait for the next six month temporary maternity cover post and then see yourself lose out to a NQT who is cheaper than you when a position appears.
    I'm an experienced teacher, I work regularly on contracts and I love what do, but as a career and a lifestyle mine has been shockingly poor since I changed career in at 30. I would not advise anyone to take that route unless they offer science at high school level; the commitments are simply too great and the opportunities too few.
     
  5. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    Nice. [​IMG]
    That wasn't really the point I was getting at...(more the cruddy work)
    But up to a point, you're right. Outside of English, Maths, Science and PE it can be difficult (Admittedly I have the "luxury" of a permanent ICT position), but it's not like this is the first career in existence where life can be difficult or far from guaranteed (or stressful).
    But I don't believe you to be entirely right - there are permanent positions out there, even if they're rarer. This job can be a royal pain in the backside, but it doesn't mean it will be - There are so many factors.
    Yours is one point of view, no doubt coloured by some pretty harsh experiences. Mine is another...and I'm not sure it makes either of us right. To come running here and virtually screaming "Don't do it!" is unfair - you (and I) are one amongst thousands.
    It's not a job for everyone. Maybe it should be more selective. It chews out plenty of people. But we need some of them, those with whatever passes for the "right stuff"* in teaching.
    *Yup, strapping yourself to a rocket and hoping it doesn't explode.
     
  6. FollyFairy

    FollyFairy Occasional commenter

    In a way, I agree with both sides of this argument. Teaching can be the best job in the world and I have had great days when students finally 'get it' or thanked me! However, the negative aspects are very real for many, many teachers - just read JobSeekers, Unemployed Teachers or Workplace Dilemmas... would I have trained all those years ago if I knew then what I know now? I don't think so..
     
  7. barneystinson

    barneystinson New commenter

    Is this an attempt to reduce the number of people training to become a teacher? Because I don't think it's working.
     
  8. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    Today I had a horrible day with all sorts of issues, from oiky year 9s to barking year 11s with very little time to finish their coursework (also in a mess not of my making) and then there's the data I didn't record on the network...
    Tomorrow's another day. I'll dust myself off and be ready for it.
     
  9. barneystinson

    barneystinson New commenter

    I think your username should be sadgreenfrog.
    Seriously though, if you hate teaching so much then why don't you change career.
    (I'm expecting a lot of talk and excuses why this isn't actually possible).
     
  10. happygreenfrog

    happygreenfrog Occasional commenter

    Your opinion. Bet you've had a job since leaving your training college and are completely out of touch with reality.
    I love my job and don't need to detail my commitments to you. I generally find I'm the most motivated, the most inspriring to kids and lone positive individual in the staffrooms I join. I meet many teachers along the way who shouldn't be there, with poor attitudes, lack of interpersonal skills or simply needing a change of scene, but unable to get one. Problem is for most, they are on a good salary and just couldn't find anything comparable elsewhere so they stick it out doing their mental state and kids no favours at all.
    As for me, I do ok but let us not kid ourselves the teaching world is a bed of roses. Get on the overseas forum and see the teachers unable to return to the UK as they cannot find jobs, or the poor NQT's who are struggling to get on a shortlist or even get a few supply days. Then throw in the poor souls working their butts off in inner city schools yet earning the same salary as some cushy leafy lane post - work that one out! I sometimes wonder if the latter even know what teaching is all about.
     

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