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Should I stay or should I go?

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by spudulike666, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. What to do? Two weeks until school starts. The sick feeling, the stomach churning, the laying awake in bed at night, the crying, the becoming anxious and distant personality. I can't face picking up my school work and starting it because I just don't want to go back. I'm starting a new school - not through choice, but through school closure.I've already had a few week's induction in the summer term. And it was awful. I don't want to go back. I just don't want to be there. Obviously I can't leave until Christmas, which is a long time to be in a job you hate. I want to fire up my passion for teaching again in a place where the management are nice, they care, they don't expect you to drop everything and change all the time and 'put up and shut up'.
    Any thoughts or advice?[​IMG]
     
  2. What to do? Two weeks until school starts. The sick feeling, the stomach churning, the laying awake in bed at night, the crying, the becoming anxious and distant personality. I can't face picking up my school work and starting it because I just don't want to go back. I'm starting a new school - not through choice, but through school closure.I've already had a few week's induction in the summer term. And it was awful. I don't want to go back. I just don't want to be there. Obviously I can't leave until Christmas, which is a long time to be in a job you hate. I want to fire up my passion for teaching again in a place where the management are nice, they care, they don't expect you to drop everything and change all the time and 'put up and shut up'.
    Any thoughts or advice?[​IMG]
     
  3. Blimey! Not very encouraging to read for me about to begin my PGCE, and I'm probably not the right person to answer your question, what do I know, right?
    But how about you sit down and brainstorm all the reasons why you became a teacher in the first place? Maybe it would help you reconnect with your own ambition and forget about the bad experiences you allude to in your post. I'm sure you weren't thinking about managers when you made the decision to teach.
     
  4. I don't really have much by way of advice but I really feel your pain. I have never felt like this about school before but now I am having sleepless nights, panics about work and nightmares all the time. I have sat down to do a really simple task for school and am crying over the bloody thing!
    Experiencing the same problems with management and ridiculous demands, constantly changing goalposts and always being told that nothing is good enough. We are expected to just drop everything and work every hour under the sun at the moment. Morale is below rock bottom.
    Im at a loss for what to do! I love the school, staff and children but my mental health can't take much more.
     
  5. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Me too! I am dreading going back, keep waking up at 5 am thinking about the piles of stuff there will be to do and the mountain of pressure to improve grades and keep all the parents happy. (Not allowed to raise voice at any time in school in case children run home and tell tales and parents complain.)
    I'd be looking for another job, but there are not many around (NONE in my county!).
    Sorry this is not much help, all I can advise is prioritise, set yourself a number of tasks for each day and stick to that. Don't take work home and fill your weekends with fun things to take your mind off school!
     
  6. Sorry for all of you!
    The thing I dislike about education in state schools now is this constant emphasis on change. Every new fad that comes along is shoe-horned in, as if all schools were the same. There should be a much longer period of consolidation, where teachers can hone their lessons without having to anxiously check that boxes have been pointlessly ticked. If you have a stock of lessons that you are used to delivering, and don't have to keep constantly changing to something that isn't your style at all, you have the opportunity to perfect other aspects of your work. Instead of which it's all change and nothing ever settles.
     
  7. The worrying thing is I'm sure it is only set to get much worse.
     
  8. Just as if there's a magic formula that will raise every child's attainment to just the level the school's position in the league table requires.
    Spudulike, if you had a disruptive introduction to your new school, it could be that it's left a bitter taste. It may be though, that when you get back in September and you're all starting the new year together, so to speak, the reality will feel better than the anticipation.
     

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