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should I be questionning myself?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by confusedaspie, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. confusedaspie

    confusedaspie New commenter

    Ive been looking for a different view point on my situation and could genuinely use some guidance as ive posted before on this issue. Any help appreciated!
    I teach a key stage 2 class with a disruptive child. He was going to a behaviour room for about three quarters of the week for the last year however when he returned to class there have often been various issues (this has existed since year2) Examples this year have included throwing objects at other children, throwing chairs, trying to escape from school and at one point being escorted back by the police (this being the most extreme situation) He has now come back into class full time. I have no ta support. I had made him a reward chart which had been suggested by a behavioural psychologist in year 3 and made clear rewards expectations and consequences. On monday there was an issue at dinner time and coming back to class he ripped up the sheet. He was eventually escorted out of class. It came to a head today. We were playing a game and he lost. He ripped the game I had made and began throwing pencils around the class. He then threw a rubber at my face before throwing tennis balls at the children. He was asked to leave to calm down and picked up a chair which he threatened to throw. He took a childs work and threw it in the bin before stealing mugs childrensitems off their desk. I called for help another teacher eventually came but couldn't remove him. He eventually calmed down. I nearly cried during this period because I didnt know what to do for my class safety. I have no support from smt, last time a very similar incident occured I was told I was obviously not managing him properly . He is given no consequences, never dealt with by smt. However its now got me questionning my ability. Why cant I cope with his behaviour? Why cant I stop this happening? Why do I have to call for other staff? What do I do if no one comes? I cant even talk to the head as it I am made to feel like an incompetent little girl. My boyfriend has full support from his smt at his school. Is this all my fault?
     
  2. confusedaspie

    confusedaspie New commenter

    Ive been looking for a different view point on my situation and could genuinely use some guidance as ive posted before on this issue. Any help appreciated!
    I teach a key stage 2 class with a disruptive child. He was going to a behaviour room for about three quarters of the week for the last year however when he returned to class there have often been various issues (this has existed since year2) Examples this year have included throwing objects at other children, throwing chairs, trying to escape from school and at one point being escorted back by the police (this being the most extreme situation) He has now come back into class full time. I have no ta support. I had made him a reward chart which had been suggested by a behavioural psychologist in year 3 and made clear rewards expectations and consequences. On monday there was an issue at dinner time and coming back to class he ripped up the sheet. He was eventually escorted out of class. It came to a head today. We were playing a game and he lost. He ripped the game I had made and began throwing pencils around the class. He then threw a rubber at my face before throwing tennis balls at the children. He was asked to leave to calm down and picked up a chair which he threatened to throw. He took a childs work and threw it in the bin before stealing mugs childrensitems off their desk. I called for help another teacher eventually came but couldn't remove him. He eventually calmed down. I nearly cried during this period because I didnt know what to do for my class safety. I have no support from smt, last time a very similar incident occured I was told I was obviously not managing him properly . He is given no consequences, never dealt with by smt. However its now got me questionning my ability. Why cant I cope with his behaviour? Why cant I stop this happening? Why do I have to call for other staff? What do I do if no one comes? I cant even talk to the head as it I am made to feel like an incompetent little girl. My boyfriend has full support from his smt at his school. Is this all my fault?
     
  3. QFE

    QFE New commenter

    Don't blame yourself. I suspect he will be doing the same all through his school life. I had a somewhat similar experience and I let it get to me 'I am a bad teacher' etc.
    Try not to let it get to you. July is not too far away...
     
  4. No, I don't think this is all your fault. It sounds as if you have a very difficult child there who is endangering your class. If I were you I would log every single incident that occurs. If SMT aren't going to do anything perhaps when faced with evidence thay MAY do something. If not, it sounds as if you may have to take this further, perhaps governors or advisors. At least if you have documentary evidence they can't say you're exaggerating. If they still say that you aren't handling him properly ask them to come and teach so that you can observe how to handle him and get some new strategies. You never know you may get some help or they may realise just how bad he is. Good luck, this sounds a horrible situation to be in.
     
  5. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    Don't blame yourself at all, this is the child's (parents?) problem which has become a problem for you. However you are not the cause of the problem. Is there any support from your union? or senco? I assume if he's spending so much time out of class, he must be way behind academically. Could there be support for him down this avenue? You wouldn't be in class on your own with him then.
    Your smt is being completely unreasonable in not supporting you, or the child for that matter. I would be looking for another job if it were me. There are children like this everywhere unfortunately but most schools ahve good procedures in place to manage them properly.
    Don't despair, just remember the good bitss about teaching and focus on the other ssmashing lot of kids you have in your class.

     
  6. Have you arranged a meeting with the head about it? Is there a CAF? Which agencies are involved? He needs a pupil risk assessment- ask the head about this. Does he have an IBP? Is the SENCo involved? Are parents supportive and does he behave in the same way at home? Is the behaviour also consistent for other staff and on the playground and around school?
    His behaviour is extreme. What triggers these outbursts? Did he behave like this last year or is he new to the school? Do you have records from the previous school?
    Does the child have autistic tendencies or any mental health issues?
    DON'T blame yourself. It sounds like this situation needs specialist advice and support.
    Request that the 'CAF Champion' (yes, every school should have one!) completes a CAF and a Child Action Meeting is called to agree ways forward- you need the Ed Psych, yourself, Head/Senco, local Behaviour Support Service, Local SEN service and any relevant other agencies in your area as well as parents.
    NO IT'S NOT YOUR FAULT!
    If there is already a CAF, request a review.
    In addition check your policies on: Behaviour, Physical Restraint, Health and Safety, Special Needs for relevant sections. There also might be staff welfare type policies which are worth a read. These should be accessible to you- if not request them.
    If you still feel it's moving nowhere, have a chat with your local union rep. and possibly seek a meeting with them and the head. Try to be positive and work with people in your school but make it clear that the situation is putting others at risk, detrimental to the education of the rest of the class and is beginning to affect your well-being.
    Keep daily records of events- tell your senior team you are doing this and ask if there is any set pro-forma they want you to use. Parents must also know about any records that being kepty and are entitled to copies- as your senior team how they'd like you to share information with parents under the freedom of information act.
    You MUST have agreed strategies (if there are none in policies) to keep others safe and minimise the impact, e.g. removing class to safety if you have a spare room, when any physical restraint is appropriate.
    Try to stay positive, there are pathways, strategies and support accessible but you need multi-agency and home/school working and need to go throught relevant channels.

     
  7. july is actually a long way away and you should not be expected to have this child in your classroom without ta support on health and safety grounds, let alone effective teaching grounds
    everything ra says - logging and also logging what you have reported to cover yourself if something happens to one of the other kids that you can't prevent
    we have a number of kids who should have statements but the la are dragging their heels - the budget has to be stretched and other classes deprived of ta's to keep them watched - as a parent, if push came to shove, i would rather my child was safe than taught
    (not meaning to imply you don't teach)
     

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