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Shortage of HTML/Javascript programmers...

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by Ulex, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone

    I had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine last night; he is a project manager and has been working in the computer industry for nearly 20 years. He told me that they are basically crying out to find HTML/CSS/Javascript programmers, but just can't get them.
    He said they could literally take on 7 new people tomorrow if only they could find them, on a very good salary (circa £30k) for someone just starting in the industry.
    Being a secondary ICT teacher (albeit a trainee), and also an X generationer, I was one of the first to see computers at secondary school. Programming for me was a revelation, and it was what got me interested in computers. I was shocked to find out that programming is not taught in any way in ICT lessons when I started teaching in September this year.
    I spent one lesson teaching my class HTML (I am at an all-girls school) and at first they were confused and thought it stupid and boring - but then, as soon as they opened up their pages in Internet Explorer they were hooked, They loved it, and the following week were gutted that they weren't carrying on with it. I can honestly say it was the best reaction from them of any work so far.

    Just thought I would share these observations with you all!

    Ulex

     
  2. Hi everyone

    I had an interesting conversation with a friend of mine last night; he is a project manager and has been working in the computer industry for nearly 20 years. He told me that they are basically crying out to find HTML/CSS/Javascript programmers, but just can't get them.
    He said they could literally take on 7 new people tomorrow if only they could find them, on a very good salary (circa £30k) for someone just starting in the industry.
    Being a secondary ICT teacher (albeit a trainee), and also an X generationer, I was one of the first to see computers at secondary school. Programming for me was a revelation, and it was what got me interested in computers. I was shocked to find out that programming is not taught in any way in ICT lessons when I started teaching in September this year.
    I spent one lesson teaching my class HTML (I am at an all-girls school) and at first they were confused and thought it stupid and boring - but then, as soon as they opened up their pages in Internet Explorer they were hooked, They loved it, and the following week were gutted that they weren't carrying on with it. I can honestly say it was the best reaction from them of any work so far.

    Just thought I would share these observations with you all!

    Ulex

     
  3. gavcradd

    gavcradd New commenter

    I agree with everything you're saying (apart from HTML being a programming language, tut tut[​IMG]). I'm probably the generation before you, in that I taught myself to program with Spectrums and C64s in the mid 80s. I'm doing all I can in my current school to introduce programming - whether that be through suitable academic courses (I've been running A Level Computing for 7 or 8 years and GCSE Computing for the first time this year), lunchtime clubs, through ICT lessons using things such as Scratch and so on.
    There's been a lot of interest recently about computing as a discipline and Government has been making noises about supporting its re-introduction. Quite how that will work is anyone's guess but it's certainly a move in the right direction.
    I think that as a trainee ICT teacher with skills and interest in this area, you're coming along at just the right time and (hopefully) won't be short of job offers. I know one of the key problems with widespread introduction is teacher skills / interest; typical Business-trained teachers either can't or aren't interested in moving away from death-by-Powerpoint presentations.
    Where is your friend's business by the way? I used to work as a web programmer (mainly ASP) before coming into teaching, I could alway be tempted back out again...
     
  4. Hi there
    Well, did I say HTML was a programming language?! You know what I meant.... and it is a good introduction to them as it is interpreted. Anyhoo. I think I would be the same generation as you - I started on a ZX81 in 1981 (we are the X generation don't you know ;-) ).
    My friend is in London. It's not his business, he's just a Project Manager. I think classic ASP programmers are enjoying a bit of a revivial too in fact, working on legacy systems.
    I am thinking about starting a Computing Club, but can't hel;p wondering whether anyone would turn it, what with it being an all-girls school! Most arent that interested in coding (although some are) and in my experience female coders are rare!
    kind regards


    Ulex
     
  5. tonyuk

    tonyuk Occasional commenter

    I think you go for it and see what happens - we teach CISCO and next years cohort will have three girls in it which is amazingly rare in the World yet alone secondary schools!
    All coders are rare when I started in industry XX years ago the shortage was in SQL programmers and when I left industry to come into teaching it still was and still is.
    We have links with a partner ICT company and they have at least 10 positions going!
     
  6. Hi
    One thing about Javascript/HTML/CSS is that the kids will have everything they need to try out coding for themselves at home. i.e. Editor, Browser.... (Windows or Mac, although Mac Text Edit need a couple of options setting to stop it displaying HTML as a website.)
    I was a bit disheartened at the critic of teaching Javascript in another thread in favour of 'more serious' licensed languages. In my book, if you can write in Javascript and understand what you're doing, it won't take you long to learn any other structured language.
    The strategy I've been using with low to mid ability students is to show them a few basics and then let them tinker with altering a larger project to see what happens. That gets them feeling powerful and able plus developing bug finding skills.
    Hot-Potatoes http://hotpot.uvic.ca/ for example is a freeware suite which generates Dynamic HTML Quizzes from source CSS and Javascript routines which can be freely edited. Make a few changes to the source directory and the program functions differently. Great to get going with coding.
    Regards
     
  7. What sort of things do they do ? Are you doing jQuery sort of things with web pages, or running more classical type applications ?
     
  8. Hi
    Thanks for the reply. My kids are actual SEN learning and behavioural difficulties. I'm really only doing basic stuff like HTML tags, very simple CSS so they can change the look at a stroke and very simple Javascript, input, variable types e.g. Why 2+2= 22!, loops, output to screen etc.
    While the Hot Pot suite is heavily based on CSS, they can change some parameters and get a result straight away. The extensive var definitions at the start of the program has variables such as how many lines in puzzle, pixel gap between wordsetc , so they can change those variables by hand to get started. A lot better than "Hello World".
    After a bit of experience with that, we've programmed tables in HTML made arrays and done a 'bubble sort' with Javascript. It's slow, but they're motivated and make progress.
    My best pupil has a little intranet-webiste with jokes in an Array which get called at random. Our internet filter blocked his site as 'time wasting' which he thought was great! Of course I opened up an exception for him.

    Regards
     

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