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Shoeing your sense of humour in an interview?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by MAX2012, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Hi, I had an interview today and everything went really well. They told me my teaching was strong which was great! And even my answers in the interview were good according to the head, however they said I was unsuccessful on this occasion and the feedback I got was that I didn't show my sense of humour enough in the interview :S Can anyone give me any advice as to how I can improve on this? I admit that I am rather a nervous person when it comes to interviews. Thanks Katy
     
  2. Hi, I had an interview today and everything went really well. They told me my teaching was strong which was great! And even my answers in the interview were good according to the head, however they said I was unsuccessful on this occasion and the feedback I got was that I didn't show my sense of humour enough in the interview :S Can anyone give me any advice as to how I can improve on this? I admit that I am rather a nervous person when it comes to interviews. Thanks Katy
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Good gracious!
    This is the typical "Let's think of some feedback that is pretty innocuous".
    It is a professional meeting, NOT an audition for a comedy show. You are not supposed to show your sense of humour, so don't try.
    The most I could say is that you should try to smile a bit more - many candidates are so nervous that they can glare at the panel!
    But DO NOT TRY TO TELL A JOKE OR SHOW SENSE OF HUMOUR in an interview.
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    My advice is don't even try. Feedback is a fickle beast, and it usually amounts to nothing better than a 'what can we say to this candidate?' fob-off. They preferred another candidate is all you can take from this particular situation - and remember, as making appointments is not rocket science, they might not have preferred the best candidate.
    I loathe those heads and governing bodies who put the words 'a sense of humour' on person specs for jobs, because it's (a) totally subjective - one person's sense of humour is often not another's, (b) you cannot assess such a thing and certainly not at interview and (c) some of the most superb teachers I've known and had the pleasure of having on my staff have had little in the way of what I'd call a sense of humour.
    I have had candidates who have attempted to make jokes in interviews and it's often fallen flat, althogh those who are naturally witty have occasionally made quips appropriate to the situation which I've enjoyed. They haven't got the job because of it, however. And you'll note carefully how I emboldened a phrase earlier - because I've also known candidates make 'jokes' entirely inappropriate to the situation.
    Smile more. Take lots of deep breaths as you do so and this will give you more thinking time. Look people in the eyes when they speak to you and smile and nod in agreement at things they say (unless it's palpable nonsense, etc). Talk about children enthusiastically and use examples of children doing good things, making good progress, etc as part of your answers.
    But to return to my first point - don't try to show 'a sense of humour'. Show how good a teacher you are instead.
     
  5. MizUnderstood

    MizUnderstood New commenter

    I'm only a trainee but I am pretty good at showing my sense of humour at interviews so this is how I got mine across for my last job and also for my training place:
    At a job interview for Cover Supervisor I was asked "What would you do if you turned up to a lesson and no work had been set?" my response was "Well first I would ask the children, and if their response was 'We've been playing on our Nintendo DSs' then I would probably ask another techer in the department what I should be doing with them!" This response made the Head and the Deputy laugh but the governor sat there with a real sourpuss look no matter what I said, I think she had had a sense of humour bypass!
    At my PGCE interview I was asked what I do in my spare time, my response was "Well, after finishing my degree last year I've had so much free time that I've taken up lots of hobbies, I do cardmaking, jewellery making, knitting (but I can only do scarfs!), and believe it or not I go to around 6-8 gym classes a week....they're clearly not working very well!" (I'm several stone overweight!!)
    I do sometimes wonder whether I am humerous at inappropriate times, but it's my humour that relaxes me, and it clearly didn't harm me for these 2 instances, however, I'm not sure how confident I would be being this 'relaxed' at a teaching job interview!
    Best of luck with it all!
     
  6. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    Theo and me - peas in the professional pod.
     
  7. MizUnderstood

    MizUnderstood New commenter

    Definately listen to the professionals!
    I don't try to be funny, but sometimes my nervousness is overcome with a funny quip, however, if this doesn't come naturally to people then it would look forced and wouldn't be a good thing either!
    Be yourself and the right job for you will turn up!
     
  8. Thanks guys I feel alot better hearing your views it knocked my confidence yesterday.
     
  9. dt201

    dt201 Occasional commenter

    I agree with others, sounds like they were just trying to think of something to say for feedback. At one interview in feedback they hinted I shouldn't use a sense of humour in an interview, so the next one I was serious and was then told I didn't show my sense of humour and that was why they picked the other girl. Different people want to see very different things in interviews so I think just try and be yourself but do make sure you smile.
    I was asked in an interview (not teaching) years ago to tell them a bit about myself. For some unknown reason I said "Well I'm a virgo" then giggled nervously at myself! They had completely straight faces so I then pretended I hadn't said that and started again. I got the job and it was never mentioned.
    I was so nervous at my first teaching interview and it was going so badly that in the middle the head asked me if it was my first interview and I just blurted out "obviously". I should have just picked up my stuff and left then I think!
     

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