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Sharing arrangements for choir

Discussion in 'Music' started by MusicteacherMagnus, May 3, 2012.

  1. I have found that purchased choir arrangements usually don't work in a school environment. It seems arrangers quite often aim to be clever and the result just doesn't sound effective. I just notated an arrangement I found on youtube and it works well because there's no 'funny stuff' in it, it's just the song sung in two part harmony.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlfzbmPS3n4
    If anyone wants it let me know and I can mail to you. Even better if you have something you can give me in return.

     
  2. I have found that purchased choir arrangements usually don't work in a school environment. It seems arrangers quite often aim to be clever and the result just doesn't sound effective. I just notated an arrangement I found on youtube and it works well because there's no 'funny stuff' in it, it's just the song sung in two part harmony.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlfzbmPS3n4
    If anyone wants it let me know and I can mail to you. Even better if you have something you can give me in return.

     
  3. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    But it's horribly low! Those obviously talented (but seated. Why?) children could hardly sing a lot of the notes. I've got heaps of music that's a lot more suitable and singable than this piece.
     
  4. And why has the director/accompanist got his back to them? I agree they are talented
     
  5. bod99

    bod99 New commenter

    Bizarre seating arrangement.
     
  6. The reason I posted this was to suggest sharing of arrangements. Notating this easy arrangement still takes a lot of time. One of the replies implies some of you already have all the material you need, but maybe someone else out there is in a similar situation as me, where all arrangements have to be specially written for a non-experienced small school choir.
     
  7. LennoxBerkeley

    LennoxBerkeley New commenter

    My friends, this is wonderful and confirms the need for a comedy-gold forum on this site. Thankyou for brightening up my morning with this 'arrangement'.
    Lennox
     
  8. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    There is no lack of suitable music. I have masses, most of which I got free or nearly free from sales and so on. There is a huge amount of downloadable and very cheap music on the internet. Whenever I want a song I haven't got I have a quick look and am rarely disappointed. And if you're after simple two part harmony why wouldn't you just write in a second part?
     
  9. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    Sorry, I didn't mean to sound harsh. It's just that lack of music is one thing I've never suffered from and you seemed to be suggesting that finding suitable music was a problem, whereas it seems to me there is an embarrassment of material just there for the taking.
     
  10. I know this sounds mercanery (sp?) but while I am willing to let an arrangement out of my sight for certain ocassions, I don't generally want to share them for free. Over the years I've built up a collection of about 25 and am adding to them all the time. It IS quite time consuming but you do get exactly what you need and buying enough copies of, say, the oxford series, is very expensive. I am sort of hoping that one day I will get agreement from the copyright holders (not that difficult, I've done it before) and sell them in books. There are 12,000 schools in England and five times that in the US - do the maths.
    I agree that a large number of arrangements are entirely unsuitable for young choirs except those of the highest standard who have a good level of score reading. it's the trixy bits that are quite unnecessary.
    As a result I see many school "choirs" singing songs almost entirely in unison from copies of the piano/vocal score. Often at inappropriate pitches. it's boring for them and boring for the audience.
    My suggestion: take some simple songs - sing them with soloists or antiphonal parts in the verses then add simply harmonies to choruses or bridges. Dont' forget that sometimes the Altos want the tune. you can also add call and response style echos and children can actually cope with that more easily than homophonic parts where they have to hold a similar line agains the melody part.
    I'm taking a mixed adult/children community choir at the moment and I do the arranging in the rehearsal - when we've fixed the inidividual parts I just note them down on the master copy so I don't forget what we've done. Evet that works!
    Get stuck in!
     

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