1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Shaking Hands

Discussion in 'Education news' started by Iftilsi, Jun 7, 2016.

Tags:
  1. delnon

    delnon Lead commenter

    The issue of faith schools and single-sex faith schools is far from ignored in the UK.


    http://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/jun/14/taxpayers-should-not-fund-faith-schools

    But Rabbi Jonathan Romain, chair of the Accord Coalition (which campaigns for inclusive education), said faith schools could be "divisive" and risked fostering "educational apartheid" where children of different faiths were ostensibly "ghettoised". He said: "They can limit the horizons of the children by focusing on faith to the exclusion of other areas; schools should be about education, not indoctrination."
     
  2. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    @Iftilsi hasn't insisted this. He's arguing for the option, just as you or I might argue for your preference as an option.
     
  3. abacus1982

    abacus1982 Established commenter

    Yes he has.
    [This comment/section/image has been removed for breaching ourCommunity Guidelines/Terms and conditions]
    These schools also should have no non Muslim teachers. That is not the same as saying that they should have the option of going to Muslim schools.
     
    cellerdore likes this.
  4. delnon

    delnon Lead commenter

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_views_on_slavery

    The Arab slave trade was most active in West Asia, North Africa, and Southeast Africa. In the early 20th century (post World War I), slavery was gradually outlawed and suppressed in Muslim lands, largely due to pressure exerted by Western nations such as Britain and France.[2] For example, Saudi Arabia and Yemen only abolished slavery in 1962 under pressure from Britain; Oman followed suit in 1970, and Mauritania in 1905, 1981, and again in August 2007.[12] However, slavery claiming the sanction of Islam is documented presently in the predominantly Islamic countries of Chad, Mauritania, Niger, Mali, and Sudan.[13][14]
     
  5. abacus1982

    abacus1982 Established commenter

    Christianity is also the largest practicing religion. Followed very closely in second by Jedi I believe
     
  6. cellerdore

    cellerdore Occasional commenter

    In
    The satire is strong in this one. i claimed Jedi on the last census, quite annoyed that they refused to recognise it as a religion despite (if I remember correctly) 300,000 people claiming they were practising. Just think, we could be having Jedi faith schools about now. Oh, the possibilities
     
  7. abacus1982

    abacus1982 Established commenter

    Alas I think the PC brigade would make us have a Sith faith school to ensure we don't offend anyone. That'd be an interesting school football match between the local Jedi and sith schools!
     
    cellerdore likes this.
  8. cellerdore

    cellerdore Occasional commenter

    And you just know the sith school is going to turn into academy, start a chain and "force" the Jedi to join their empire. Gove would make an excellent palpatine- he's got the nose for it anyway...;)
     
    abacus1982 likes this.
  9. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    @Iftilsi
    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices...ather-than-isis-or-islamophobes-a6875446.html

    I understand that Mohammed PBUH did free Bilal and he encouraged his followers to free slaves as a charitable act. Unfortunately, various verses have been deliberately misinterpreted to allow hideous abuses to take place, by Muslims themselves.

    And this is why your penultimate paragraph of your first post offended me so deeply.

    The other thing to point out is that Mohammed's first wife, Khadijah, did have property. She was a very successful business woman who hired Mohammed to work for her. Her property was absolutely her own, and her decision to marry Mohammed was entirely her own. She asked him, sought no one else's opinion on this matter as she was confident in her judgement of Mohammed's character. If women had no rights to property before Islam, how did she come by, develop and retain her business? She was entirely independent in every way. Now she is simply a wife, then she was powerful. When compared with his other wives, she was a giant. In fact a rather better role model for girls meek, quiet, silent shrouded figures Muslimas are expected to be.


    There was a golden age of learning in Islam, scholars that travelled far and wide, translated books from Latin and Greek, developed scientific techniques and mathematical concepts we still use today. This learning was not done in seclusion or through segregation, it emerged through discourse and engagement with other cultures, discussions, debates, knowledge exchange and taking intellectual risks.

    I don't think there should be "mono-religious" schools. I don't think that there should be single sex schools either.

    All schools should be places of enlightenment, joyous, engaging, stimulating where members of all religions or no religion can work productively and learn from each other.

    I disagree with you, because you have an isolationist view point.

    Happy Ramadan, by the way.
     
    delnon likes this.
  10. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    @cellerdore

    Re: we are all recycled star dust

    Water is recycled dinosaur wee!
     
  11. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Shame this is no longer the case in countries like Saudi Arabia.

    Have you not been watching the news at all then? Is 200 lashes for being an atheist not torture? Is persecuting homosexuals and throwing them off rooftops to their deaths better than burning them? http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/saudi-arabia-sentence-man-to-10-years-in-prison-and-2000-lashes-for-expressing-his-atheism-on-a6900056.html
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/isis-persecution-gay-men-murder-lgbt-muslim-society/

    Article 9 - Freedom of thought, belief and religion

    No they're not - polygamous marriages are recognised in the UK if they have taken place in a country where such marriages are legal. They are not allowed to take place in the UK under UK law, nor are they recognised as valid marriages under UK law.

    There should be NO religious courts in the UK whose decisions override the laws of the UK, and sharia law courts are no more than arbitration tribunals. A divorce as granted by a sharia court has no validity in UK law if the marriage is valid in UK law.

    Not according to this http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukn...ls-40pc-of-Muslims-want-sharia-law-in-UK.html

    Britain is a heck of a lot more tolerant than a good many muslim countries.
     
  12. SteveKindle

    SteveKindle Occasional commenter



    And so it should remain. We shouldn't use intolerance elsewhere as an excuse to be intolerant here.
     
  13. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    @iftilisi

    If Britain is so awful, why do so many refugees want to live here?

    I understand that you want your children to be religious, but 'fitna' and 'fasaad' is created by people being intolerant of other's views.

    If you want great children, be kind, supportive, generous, respectful, educated parents. Be the embodiment of a sophisticated, intelligent Muslim. In fact create harmony in your home... When society challenges your view point, discuss it in considered, thoughtful terms at home.

    Please be rational, just because someone doesn't agree with you it doesn't make them intolerant, or racist.

    SSS
     
    delnon and chelsea2 like this.
  14. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    Did you read the penultimate paragraph of Iftilisi's original post?

    I can tolerate a lot of things, but my sensibilities are not strong enough to tolerate those sentiments.

    SSS
     
  15. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Established commenter

    Islam most certainly isn't tolerant of other faiths and especially Christianity. Despite there being millions of Christian foreign workers in Saudi, for example, there is not one single church. It's forbidden. Yet Saudi (and other oil-rich Arab countries) is quite happy to fund the building of mosques around the world, including the UK, and quite happy to fund their extreme brand of worship in the shape of wahhibism. There is no two way, tolerant give and take here. There is no way Christians can openly and communally worship in Saudi.

    The only outcome possible from all of this is that Islam and extremism spreads and Christianity is persecuted and shrinks. Islam tolerant? Only if you are a Muslim.
     
    monicabilongame likes this.
  16. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    No, he hasn't.
     
  17. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    There is nothing wrong with the opening post. If you find the TES Community too edgy for your sensibilities then other fora are available. The internet is a big place.
     
  18. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    Those murderers are not Muslims. They are barely human. If someone were to walk up to you and a friend, introduce themselves as a Christian and then punch your friend in the face, would you say their claim to be a Christian was justified?
     
  19. slingshotsally

    slingshotsally Star commenter

    There is plenty of conflict between Shia and Sunni, just as there was/is between Protestants and Catholics.

    If there was a country with a Muslim government which was successful, tolerant and peaceful, where conflict was managed through negotiations, has free education, freedom of religion, women able to work freely and have equal rights which were upheld.....

    Then I would agree with iftilisi...

    But I don't want people being thrown off buildings, girls being held and raped... That's my vision of hell. The refugees who come and risk their children drowning seem to have the same view.
     
  20. harsh-but-fair

    harsh-but-fair Star commenter

    Says who?
     

Share This Page