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Severely poor behaviour - entering Year 4

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by milliebear1, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. Hi there
    I already posted about this issue on the Primary forum and one person advised getting advice here too.
    I have a child coming into my class next year with severe behaviour issues. These are long-standing and have proved extremely difficult to impact upon in other years. Parents believe he is being scapegoated and so are not hugely supportive, although they also have very poor behaviour from him at home.
    Essentially, child hurts other children, is constantly rude, shouts out, talks over the teacher etc. Now all of that I have dealt with effectively in the past; my concern is that with this child, no sanction appears to have any effect at all. He has previously made an unfounded allegation of physical harm against another member of staff, and is extremely manipulative. He can turn his disruptive behaviour on and off. He has been assessed by mental health services, who stated on his report that he displays 'sociopathic' traits. He doesn't care about missed playtimes, missed Golden Time, parents being involved etc etc. Praise ad reward systems have been tried and have had zero impact. He just seems impervious to it all. Recommendations from mental health and behaviour support is to 'ignore him' - totally impossible to do.
    All suggestions welcome.


     
  2. Hi there
    I already posted about this issue on the Primary forum and one person advised getting advice here too.
    I have a child coming into my class next year with severe behaviour issues. These are long-standing and have proved extremely difficult to impact upon in other years. Parents believe he is being scapegoated and so are not hugely supportive, although they also have very poor behaviour from him at home.
    Essentially, child hurts other children, is constantly rude, shouts out, talks over the teacher etc. Now all of that I have dealt with effectively in the past; my concern is that with this child, no sanction appears to have any effect at all. He has previously made an unfounded allegation of physical harm against another member of staff, and is extremely manipulative. He can turn his disruptive behaviour on and off. He has been assessed by mental health services, who stated on his report that he displays 'sociopathic' traits. He doesn't care about missed playtimes, missed Golden Time, parents being involved etc etc. Praise ad reward systems have been tried and have had zero impact. He just seems impervious to it all. Recommendations from mental health and behaviour support is to 'ignore him' - totally impossible to do.
    All suggestions welcome.


     
  3. What is the SENCO/ HT doing?
     
  4. Not a lot.
    He is School Action. We have an IBP with the usual gubbins on it - praise, encouragement, what he will do (except he doesn't). Nothing beyond that.
    His last teacher used to send him to another class, just to get a break from him.
     
  5. I can't believe this child is still in your school. All I can offer is my own experience with a child whose behaviour was appalling and who I supported in Y4. If the parents are not wholly supportive of the school's approach then you won't get anywhere. As you already know. There is some hope if sanctions within school work - the child I supported really didn't like missing playtimes as social interaction was his one strong point and the only school activity he enjoyed. In the end, however, his parents' inability to carry through any sanctions at all, and their apparent belief that we just weren't 'doing it right', led to such dangerous behaviour that he was permanently excluded. A HT with more b***s would have done it earlier.
    Your child sounds even worse. It should not be the case that one pupil is allowed to continue disrupting a class, and a school, in this way. The child we excluded went to a PRU, which also excluded him permanently. I'm surprised that other parents haven't taken some sort of action - like the previous poster said, what [on earth] are your HT and SENCO doing?
     
  6. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    Does this child not have a support teacher? I've come across many children like the one you describe, and i've completely lost my patience and sympathy for them. Why should anyone have to beckon to such madness? Just because he's a child, it doesn't make him any less dangerous, and every psychopath was once a child. You need to stir up a storm regarding his behaviour- make the SLT do something before he seriously injures a member of staff or child. You only need one child to destroy your class and the school- don't let it happen. If he's beyond help then nothing you do will work- and if it does it'll be for 10minutes and then he'll be back to his old self. I had a child like that in my class and I didn't put up with it, and neither did the school.
     
  7. What's a support teacher? We don't even have a regular TA!
    I have had him in my class for a couple of lessons now (he tends to get 'shared out') where the PPA teacher couldn't bear him any longer etc. He has been a model of good behaviour and politeness so far...I feel he is biding his time!
    Perhaps I should ask for a meeting with the Head to pre-empt any issues and plan a strategy for how to deal with his behaviour. I am tempted to simply remove him as soon as he starts, but I can only do this if I have a TA to stand outside with him. I would then, escalate for a continuance of poor behaviour, to SMT removing him, but then they aren't always available...
     
  8. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    It doesn't sound like the school are supporting you or him! Why hasn't he got a one-to-one? If he's disrupting your class and nothing is done about it- how are you meant to teach? I've had experience of disruptive children but at least the school has put strategies in place. Doesn't your school have a nurture group for children who can't cope with mainstream education? A group of parents got together once regarding a disruptive child in the class who wasn't being supported. Admittedly, the battle was tough but they got him the support he needed. This doesn't happen enough in schools, we're just expected to get on with it. If the school don't support you, let him do what he likes- eg don't force him to do work, give him time on the computer, let him play a game with a classmate etc. I know it's not fair on the other children but why battle with him constantly if it's not going to make any difference. Make sure you prepare fun, lively activities for your class, and lots of treats to balance things out.
     


  9. This is one of
    those incidents where I feel 'inclusion' has gone too far. Surely it's not in anyone’s
    best interests (including the child in question) to have him included within
    your current class or even the school.


    If his parents feel this way, then let them try enrolling him in
    another school!

    <font size="2">Rant over. </font>
    <font size="2">As for actual advice, are there any lessons where he responds
    well? Perhaps there is something that really interests him - you could put a
    small pack of work together that relates to his interests- something for him to
    independently work on (again it's not fair as a whole but may well be necessary
    for you to teach the rest of the class!).



    I saw this work for one child whose behaviour was very disruptive (granted he
    had 1:1 support, and sounds like he was less disruptive than the child you
    mention) but many situations were diffused by asking him to work on his
    "project" as this was something he was truly interested in and could
    remain calm and focussed on. This was something that was supported by the SENCO
    and encouraged by the HT too, which further raises the question about the
    involvement of your support staff!</font>

     
  10. Something I have tried with my class this year, is the whole group working towards an end of week reward. They had to maintain good behaviour (by not picking up too many 'poor behaviour marks') in order to take part. The reward was on a Friday afternoon after Golden Time.
    This worked well this year because it meant the whole class could take part in the reward (and so well behaved children weren't penalised by being excluded). The rewards were different each week (and children never knew in advnace what the reward would be that week) all of the rewards inevitably appealed to some of the children. It is hard work thinking up different ideas (and occasionally expensive)but I am willing to do it again if it nails this or even helps.
    Any thoughts on whether this might be something that might work with this child or possible issues? I am really, really keen not to give this child any reward that the other children do not have access to and this strategy would avoid that.
     
  11. Essentially, our school does not have support for behavioural issues - at least not in terms of one to one support. Partly this is because we generally have very few behaviour problems and so we aren't geared up for it. The most I've ever seen for behaviour, is an IBP and occasionally CAMS called in. Certainly, no one to one support unless statemented.
     
  12. In my area the school has to fund 15 hours one to one for 2 terms to even apply to get a statement, then of course the school has to continue the 15 hours and the rest is funded. This little chap seems very confused to me. Try to make judgements on what you experience and what you see not what others say. I would really make time to get to know him on a one to one basis. Have lunch with him at school, ask him to help you with a little job at lunchtime? breaktime? With lack of parental support sanctions will never work but your relationship with him may work. If he respects you, likes you then you have more chance of getting him to do what you want him to do. I read a very good article the other day which may make you think differently. His home life may be horrendous! He may be crying out for attention at school. Show him the way to better behaviour.
    http://www.pivotaleducation.com/i-hate-you/
     
  13. I really despaired reading the first page and I'm so glad that I went to the second. This is very sound advice. The biggest tip for improving behaviour isn't being firm and authoritarian; it's building a relationship. If you can build a good relationship with a child, they are far less likely to misbehave in the first place and if they do, they are more likely to comply with what you say because they consider you to normally be reasonable. This little boy, and I say that because that's what he is, will be fully aware that people around him are scared of him and that people don't know what to do with him. He will exploit that. Why wouldn't he? You need to be the fresh start that he needs in order to turn around his behaviour, don't give up on him before you're lucky enough to say you've got him. Getting him out of bad habits will not be easy, so don't expect a walk in the park. To the poster that said earlier this is 'inclusion gone too far', I disagree. This isn't inclusion gone too far, this is inclusion gone wrong.
     
  14. Practical advice milliebear, you need to prepare a risk assessment & management plan (RAMP) for this child. I can provide you with a template if you need it and then present it to the SENCo. RAMPs are for high risk children that are considered likely to cause harm or make allegations. It's about keep yourself, other staff and the child safe.
     
  15. Greentea and DC88, I have every intention of making a fresh start with this child, but given his history, I would be naive not to have some contingency plans in place. I have no intention of labelling him 'a bad seed' from the off, but have, as I said, seen him in action, and he has a very long record of disruptive and manipulative bahviours which have made the lives of other children and good, kind and caring staff members, an absolute misery.
    I would love to be the teacher who makes a difference for him, but I suspect that is not going to be the case given what has gone before. Yes, he has a poor homelife (in terms of poor parenting and inconsistent emotional support) and I fully accept that those things are hugely responsible for the damaged child we now have in our school, but this is a child who brought one of my kindest, most positive, most unrelentingly Pollyannaish colleagues to a near breakdown a few years ago! She is unable to find anything positive to say about this child at all, which is incredibly sad for him.
    DC88 - is the RAMP you mention a national thing, or just your school? Could you PM a copy to me?
     
  16. http://www.teachers.org.uk/node/12532
    A good pupil risk assessment has been put together by NUT. Risk assessing children of this nature is good practice and should be nationally, however, it's mostly done when a school has had a major incident in the past or they use the behaviour support service a lot. It's one of those things that can be used as evidence that you've taken every measure to protect yourself and the other children.

     
  17. spiderwomen

    spiderwomen New commenter

    I think the advice given by Greentea is good advice in a world smelling of roses! As for DC88 despairing at the previous posts because they're not all filled with showing the child love and all will be well! Don't you think all the previous teachers have tried many positive behaviour strategies and his behaviour hasn't improved? It's all very well saying have lunch with the child or have a project for him to do, but the reality is there are far to many children like the one Millibear has described that are ruining the education of all the children in the class. Unfortunately for Millibear, her school isn't equipped to deal with behaviour and are just letting in spiral out of control. There is alot of children with disruptive backgrounds, but they're not jumping on the tables, shouting out and violently attacking all the kids. I don't believe in making escuses for disruptive children because of their backgrounds - it's just text book responses and adding to the problem. I'm sure every teacher in this country does not ill wish any child, but there also has to be a line drawn between what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour. Millibear can read every book, implement every behaviour stratergy, shower the child with gifts and love and it won't make a difference for more than 10minutes! So it is inclusion gone to far or in my opinion gone completely mad!
     
  18. And I suppose you would be the type of teacher who said 'I don't care if your house burned down last night, where's your homework?'
    http://www.pivotaleducation.com/i-hate-you/
    Have a read of this...totally makes sense to me and it is how I work with children. You might call me a do gooder but the children I work with respect me totally and do what I ask them to do. It takes time to get a child's trust and build a relationship. Have you read anything on attachment disorder? There is a good article here. Let's try and change these children for the better not make them worse. Obviously nothing has worked for this little lad so far. Do you have any suggestions for helping his teacher?
    http://www.oaasis.co.uk/file.axd?pointerid=302b3c40057d450d9cab7c39e6367c0e&versionid=29f12d8aa035416da6ec5f045db73145
    You are quite right that some children cope very well with disruption in their lives and are very resilient. Infact generally girls cope very well on the outside but the damage is inside. Boys on the other hand let everyone know they are hurting. I do believe that building relationships up with these children does work. Infact I know it does. These children do need to know it is their behaviour and not them you dislike
     
  19. Just wanted to give a brief update on our first proper encounter! Has transition day earlier this week. Class (who have their fair share of issues too) were lovely. Boy x was well behaved and seemed polite enough, if a bit wary. He took part well in the activities and gave out the pencils for me when asked. He even offered to collect them in again at the end of the session.
    So far, so good. I am going to be working hard on building some sort of positive relationship with him, and am hoping he will respond to some whole class behaviour systems I am introducing (rather than singling him out for individual sanction/reward).
    Thank you for all your good advice.
     
  20. That sounds positive. It is important to judge him yourself and not listen to what others say. Maybe others were confrontational? too soft? etc.
    One NQT that I knew dealt with the toughest class ever and when asked how she did it she replied 'My behaviour management is built on my relationship with the children' I think this is the key to any successful behaviour management. Get to know each and every one of the children, have a sense of humour, be caring, firm, respectful and adaptable. It takes time but the successful teachers who I know are very much like this.
     

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