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setting up own nursery

Discussion in 'Personal' started by mancminx, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. mancminx

    mancminx New commenter

    I was chatting with one of my friends earlier, and she is thinking of setting up her own nursery Has anyone on here done this or knows of someone who has? Also, how would she go about doing it? She doesnt want to buy an existing one and would rather start from scratch.
    Thanks

     
  2. mancminx

    mancminx New commenter

    I was chatting with one of my friends earlier, and she is thinking of setting up her own nursery Has anyone on here done this or knows of someone who has? Also, how would she go about doing it? She doesnt want to buy an existing one and would rather start from scratch.
    Thanks

     
  3. She needs to contact her LA childcare rep who will be able to advise her. There used to be funding available but sadly that has gone the way of most other things..anyway her LA rep will be able to support her with a plan and check that she will be meeting all legislation - good luck!
     
  4. Seadream

    Seadream New commenter

    I've been thinking about doing this too and would also welcome any advice. I contacted my LA 3 times and they kept saying they'd put something in the post but they never did.
     
  5. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    A friend of mine has done this. She started as a childminder then employed a childminder's assistant. The nursery is in her dining room! Doing it this way meant she could expand gradually, acquiring equipment along the way. She charges a fortune and has a waiting list.
     
  6. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    I don't know where you are in the UK, but in Durham Clever Cloggs was set up by one person and is doing really well.Just remember that lots of women aren't going back to work because of the lack of jobs/ funding for child care. When I wanted care for my children, only a few years ago, you couldn't get a child minder on the estate or into the nursery because they were all full. Now loads of people have set up, because they lost their jobs, and there aren't enough children to go around.
    Good luck though -it's a good idea.

     
  7. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Before training as a teacher I looked into buying an existing Nursery with a neighbour who was a Health Visitor att he time. I'd been her childminder for several years.
    We went on an LA funded course about running a Nursery and setting up in business. There were loans available at the time but it required putting our homes up as security and nether of us were prepared to do that. ironically, she later moved and allowed her husband to persuade her to put their house up as security for his new business and they lost everything.
    OFSTED now inspects nurseries so you should get the regulations from them on building requirements and staffing. There's all sorts of paperwork to be kept (files on each child, fire safety, nutritional standards, notes on children's allergies etc).
    I have heard of childminders employing other people and running the business from home. My sister's childminder did that and offered various services as there wer at least 3 adults on staff. One would do the school run morning and afternoon. All children would be deposited at the house and there was then a walking 'bus' taking the older ones to their various schools and the reverse at the end of school. Some of the assistants were part-time and were available to cover if someone else was ill.
    You need advice on your employer responsibilities (NI, tax deduction, sick pay, maternity pay for employees etc) and book-keeping.
    You need to know what the general hourly,sessional, daily or weekly rate is in your area for different age groups and decide what happens when clients are on holiday.
     
  8. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    You'd need to be part of a larger organisation in order to get enhanced CRBs done on everyone you employ.
     
  9. Crystalsecrets

    Crystalsecrets New commenter

    My advice as someone who has worked in nurseries for years is get her to check out her local area first, get a feel for the types of nursery and quality she would be up against. Also find out how full they are, this will give an indication of how much demand there is in her area. I know of a few very good nurseries that are struggling to get children in because a lot of mothers either can't afford the childcare costs when they go back to work, or they have been made redundant etc.

    If she still wants to go ahead with it she needs to contact her local council early years team who can help and guide her on how to set up. You can also download the Early years foundation stage pack ( EYFS) which has all the statutary guidelines that need to be followed, this covers everything from what paperwork she needs to keep, to amount of floor space per child, to staff rations etc.
    And don't forget Ofsted, lol ( as if anyone could)
     

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