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Setting up a tutoring business- any advice?! :)

Discussion in 'Private tutors' started by DollyD, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Hi folks,
    Having just had my 3rd baby I'm looking to leave school and create my own tutoring business. I've done odd bits and pieces of tutoring but never seriously considered doing it for a living, rather than as a sideline, before. I have no idea really where to start. I'm looking into online tutoring but would like to put myself out there properly for 'face to face' tuition as well. Is there any advice you could give me, useful websites, etc that may help? I'm in the Midlands and my subject is English.
    Thanks in advance :)
    DD xx
     
  2. Thank you :) 20% is a lot but it's a start and perhaps worth it in the long run if it'll help get the business off the ground? Also once I'm out there I can hopefully get students through word of mouth, etc.
    Thanks again x
     
  3. yes Purelearn does take 20 % BUT... its a open market place for teachers/tutors where teachers tutors set their your own rates. (its a complete teaching business package free)
     
  4. DonutBoy99

    DonutBoy99 New commenter

    The 'free' bit confuses me greatly.
    It sounds like 'free' as in you can pick up a 12 pack of beer in a supermarket and walk up and down the aisles all day with it for 'free' but as soon as you want the true value out of it and slake your thirst you need to pay.
    I appreciate that a business exists to make money but suggesting that something is 'free' in this manner is wholly misleading.

    DB
     
  5. Hi there. I've had a page on thetutorpages.com for nearly two years now and have had some good leads from it. You pay a one-off fee to join, but then the students deal directly with you. I wouldn't say I make 'a living' from this tutoring, but it's a good way to start - you can advertise for face-to-face and/or online students. I am also registered with an agency (who take a cut), and have a listing on Yell.com - I find it helps to have a range of ways in which students can find you.
     
  6. Thank you mimimouse! I think I've decided to combine it with exam marking and finish registering as a childminder as well so I'll hopefully I'll have my fingers in a few pies.

    Incidentally, what does everyone else do to top up income if tutoring work is a bit sparse?!
    xx
     
  7. bananamoore

    bananamoore New commenter

    I do a spot of mystery shopping! A bit of fun and makes some cash/free meals when the tutoring is quiet over summer. send me a message if you want more info :)
     
  8. I have found the free sites 'Tutor Hunt' and 'First Tutors' very good for finding students. I supplement my tutoring income with supply teaching and SATs marking- they're both great ways of keeping up to date with the curriculum and teaching methods. Very flexible too.
     
  9. I also run courses during the summer in preparation for the 11+.
     
  10. Register with as many websites as possible. I get most of my referrals from www.LessonPark.com and registration is free. Good luck
     
  11. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    LessonPark looks awful and discotom is promoting a website where you have to register to search - a sign of a very dodgy business
     
  12. Some strange people, or organisations purporting to be parents, seem to haunt sites like Tutor Hunt. You often get messages with different names, but the same message in stilted English. Tutor Hunt can also send you referral messages several times, leading to you making multiple replies, which can illicit some rather testy replies.
     
  13. adamcreen

    adamcreen Occasional commenter

    Tutor Hunt has a tutor whose profile begins "I am a GCSE maths tutor who has recently resat the exam and achieved an A" - not even an A*!!
     
  14. Another tutor at TutorHunt says he has been teaching for 6 years and 100% of his GCSE and A-Level students have achieved at least grade B.


    How?


    No Foundation students?

    No students 3 weeks before the exam, who got a U in the Higher Mocks and need a C?

    No A-Level students who got a B at GCSE, and struggle to get a D at AS-Level?

    No students whose target grade is 'F', and who can't multiply 3 by 3?
     
  15. GordonNome

    GordonNome New commenter

    Maybe he refuses to take on those students? ;)
     
  16. langteacher

    langteacher Occasional commenter

    We could all post that we have an excellent success rate and I do wonder sometimes about what some people put on their profiles. Personally I prefer to be upfront about where my own strengths lie (I teach more than one subject) and this is reflected in the requests that I get. That way, there are no surprises and I don't get asked to teach higher than a certain level for one of my subjects
     
  17. To set up a tutoring business is not an easy job, to build up a new business is very difficult. Friend you should get knowledge from acropolismentors site. Which will be very useful for you.
     
  18. One thing I could only say if you want to start your tutoring business. Make sure you have your business reputation and brand name be very known and comprehensive to every one. Try providing your business with the right name and logo, get idea from this book at http://eatmywords.com/book/ this is the one I have been using for my business too.
     
  19. Take advantage of free online directories to market yourself and social media to reach and interact with your students. Also make sure you've got some affordable management software...something that allows you to manage your calendar, store student info, offer online booking, and market to local students. We use bookmycity, but there are other options out there as well.
     

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