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Sensory bags

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by janp7, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. Help needed please!
    I have purchased some muslin, and am looking to make some sensory bags. I am struggling to think of stuff to fill them with. I have obviously thought of lavender, and maybe mint and basil, but after that i have reached a standstill. Any suggestions gratefully received.
    Thanks
     
  2. Help needed please!
    I have purchased some muslin, and am looking to make some sensory bags. I am struggling to think of stuff to fill them with. I have obviously thought of lavender, and maybe mint and basil, but after that i have reached a standstill. Any suggestions gratefully received.
    Thanks
     
  3. susbo

    susbo New commenter

    Hi janp7
    Do you want ideas just for 'smelly' bags or ideas for the other senses also? I frequently change my sensory area - for smelly (in summer) I take snippets from various plants in the sensory garden - curry plant, mint, sage, etc. I also have cinnamon sticks, vanilla pod, pot puree, soap, I save coffee jar lids and put in herbal tea bags, peppermints, cotton wool with a few drops of eucalyptus oil on or olbus oil on, I have cut the end off a lemon and an orange, then revitalised them by cutting a little more off each day but I wouldn't advise it in the summer as it would atttract the flies. Spruce leaves are good as are cut flowers, hyacinths at this time of year. I have thought about putting a plug in 'smelly' too as my area is close to the toilets !!
    Hope this gives you food for thought. I must add we do a lot of modelling of appropriate behaviour - no fingers or objects near mouths or eyes, no picking the item up directly hence the use of coffee jar lids. So far no problems but do check for allergies first.
    SB

     
  4. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Sorry but I simply cannot resist:
    what if a child is allergic to coffee?

    Only joking. I don't have two-year-olds but I've always let our children rub rosemarmy, lavender etc between their fingers and sniff.
    A French pal, who's a farmer's wife, has a beautiful scented garden which is visited by local children. Scented is somehow much more enticing than sensory.
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    rosemary
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We have an outdoor sensory area with pots of lavender, sage, lemon balm, rosemary, anise hyssop, basil, thyme and catmint. In summer we have roses, scented geraniums and sweet peas to add to the mix...
    <h3>
    </h3>
     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    How lovely. Are the children allowed to touch them?
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Yes that's what they are for along with long grass and willow for touch and sound
     

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