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Sending a SEN child in to Nursery without additional adult

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Injins, Jan 4, 2012.


  1. <font size="2">Hi there, I'm after some advice. </font><font size="2">I'm an NQT working in nursery. I have 30 children in my class and staff wise there is myself, a level 3 TA and if I have 27 or more children in, then another level 3 TA. I rarely have 27 children all in on the same day so the norm' is for my class to be staffed by myself and one TA.</font><font size="2">The year 2 teacher wants me to have one of her children who has developmental delays. Apparently it has been advised (not sure by whom, an Ed Psych? ) that this pupil would benefit from spending her afternoons in nursery and having the opportunity to play (she spends her mornings doing one to one work outside of the classroom). This child has behavioural issues, including a tendency to assault other children. Before Christmas, she was sent down to my class and accompanied by a TA. However, the year 2 teacher informed me this evening that said child will be back at school tomorrow and she wants to send the child to my class without an adult. Apparently because this child is chronologically 7 she isn't counted towards my EYFS ratio and therefore if I have 26 of my own nursery children in tomorrow, I can't ask for an additional adult.

    I am willing to concede that legally she may be right on this but is it right that a) this child spends no time whatsoever in her own class with her peers? b) That my (apparently soft touch) nursery class should be a holding centre for a child waiting to be statemented? c) That she arrives at my door with no support, given her tendency to be like a human tornado and occasionally wallop children in my class? My thoughts are that while she is in my class, my nursery children are not getting their entitlement to the EYFS as mine or the TA's attention is diverted to containing 'Little Miss Tornado'. </font><font size="2">What are people's thoughts on this? As an NQT, I don't really know what I should take a stand on and what I should just 'suck up' and get on with [​IMG]</font>
     

  2. <font size="2">Hi there, I'm after some advice. </font><font size="2">I'm an NQT working in nursery. I have 30 children in my class and staff wise there is myself, a level 3 TA and if I have 27 or more children in, then another level 3 TA. I rarely have 27 children all in on the same day so the norm' is for my class to be staffed by myself and one TA.</font><font size="2">The year 2 teacher wants me to have one of her children who has developmental delays. Apparently it has been advised (not sure by whom, an Ed Psych? ) that this pupil would benefit from spending her afternoons in nursery and having the opportunity to play (she spends her mornings doing one to one work outside of the classroom). This child has behavioural issues, including a tendency to assault other children. Before Christmas, she was sent down to my class and accompanied by a TA. However, the year 2 teacher informed me this evening that said child will be back at school tomorrow and she wants to send the child to my class without an adult. Apparently because this child is chronologically 7 she isn't counted towards my EYFS ratio and therefore if I have 26 of my own nursery children in tomorrow, I can't ask for an additional adult.

    I am willing to concede that legally she may be right on this but is it right that a) this child spends no time whatsoever in her own class with her peers? b) That my (apparently soft touch) nursery class should be a holding centre for a child waiting to be statemented? c) That she arrives at my door with no support, given her tendency to be like a human tornado and occasionally wallop children in my class? My thoughts are that while she is in my class, my nursery children are not getting their entitlement to the EYFS as mine or the TA's attention is diverted to containing 'Little Miss Tornado'. </font><font size="2">What are people's thoughts on this? As an NQT, I don't really know what I should take a stand on and what I should just 'suck up' and get on with [​IMG]</font>
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Does the child have a statement of SEN (with support)?
    She would be counted in your ratio regardless of her age because she is the setting and as the majority of pupils will be under statutory school age EYFS ratios apply
    Group size
    3.25 Except in the case of reception classes in maintained schools, the size of a group or class should
    not normally exceed 26.
    3.26 Where the size of a group of children aged and three and over in a maintained school (except
    reception classes) exceeds 26, it is good practice to assign an additional teacher to the class. An
    additional teacher should always be assigned where the group size exceeds 30. If, in a registered
    setting, the size of a group of children aged three and over exceeds 26, the ratio requirement of
    one adult to thirteen children will only apply if two members of staff hold either Qualified Teacher
    Status or Early Years Professional Status or another suitable level 6 qualification.

     
  4. Hmmmmm, interesting MsZ.
    So, just to clarify, if I have all 30 of my children in, plus a year 2, I am legally under staffed? And although not breaking ratio rulings, its not good practice of my school to have over 26 and not have two teachers?
    Anyway, in answer to your question, The child does not currently have a statement. I think home have dragged their feet (they're already on a number of the agencies radar and are suspicious of authority) A statement is in the process of being granted (and is expected to grant full time one to one or a recommendation that mainstream isn't a suitable setting for her), it hasn't come through yet. Hence school says they can't afford to send someone down to my class with her, as they don't have the funding in place.
     
  5. Loony tunes

    Loony tunes New commenter

    I work in a special school so don't know the ins and outs of ratios. However I might be misreading but surely if you have 30 children on your register, it shouldn't matter how many children are actually on school on a particular day, you should have the specified number of staff? Where does the TA come from who does come into your class if you have over 26 in? What do they do the rest of the time? With regards to the year 2 pupil, it does sound like you're being taken advantage of.
     
  6. Hello,
    I had a very similar experience when I was an NQT in my inner city school. The child clearly had SEN and behaviour issues. The family were scared and perhaps in denial as they thought I could 'make him better'. The staff included myself and my Nursery Nurse for a class of 24, some of whom had their own learning needs. Both my Nursery Nurse (who had 30 yrs experience) and I ( who had worked as a Nursery nurse for 8 years) had never met a child like this in mainstream education. The first reaction from Senior management was: 'He is only 3, how difficult could it be?'


    To cut a long story short both I and my Nursery Nurse stood together. We nagged and nagged Senior Management about the right of the other children to feel safe and to get an education. A number of other agencies were involved too. We did safety assessments, strategies of our own and from others. Finally when he got a statement, we were given TWO assistants for this child as he was considered a danger to himself and others. He stayed with us for two years as Reception class refused to have him. Two things frustrate me about the whole situation. All the team thought about how we could help this little boy but no one seemed to think about the other little children who were clearly shocked at some of his behaviour. Our nursery team really had to fight for those children. The second thing is that NO ONE would say to the parents 'Your child would be better in a Special Needs school' as the parents had a 'right to choose.'


    My point is fight for your kids! Go to your Headteacher, SENCO, Mentor, anyone who will listen and state that you are willing to take this child but only with the proper support and you want to know what strategies are being used to help this child. I think you are being taken advantage of!
     

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