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SEN Units attached to mainstream schools - do they work?

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by avc1, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. I teach in a mainstream primary school with 6 SEN resources units attached. I teach in the KS2 autism class. We are finding it very difficult at the moment because as well as having to deal with the specific needs of the children we are being expected to try and keep up with the mainstream classes with regards to planning, timetable requirements, following certain schemes etc. and at the moment it just isnt working. We feel torn between dealing with curriculum requirements (preparing for SATs etc) and dealing with the childrens needs (emotional, social, behavioural etc) - I know what my priorities are but feel so much pressure at the moment. I feel working in a Special School would be better as at least then everyone is in the same boat!!
    Does anyone else have similar issues? I'd love to hear how anyone else working in SEN units gets the balance. I love the kids I work with but feel I cant cope with the pressure any more!
    Thanks
     
  2. I teach in a mainstream primary school with 6 SEN resources units attached. I teach in the KS2 autism class. We are finding it very difficult at the moment because as well as having to deal with the specific needs of the children we are being expected to try and keep up with the mainstream classes with regards to planning, timetable requirements, following certain schemes etc. and at the moment it just isnt working. We feel torn between dealing with curriculum requirements (preparing for SATs etc) and dealing with the childrens needs (emotional, social, behavioural etc) - I know what my priorities are but feel so much pressure at the moment. I feel working in a Special School would be better as at least then everyone is in the same boat!!
    Does anyone else have similar issues? I'd love to hear how anyone else working in SEN units gets the balance. I love the kids I work with but feel I cant cope with the pressure any more!
    Thanks
     
  3. My friend works in an SEBD unit of a mainstream school and she has the same issues. She tries to blend the two priorities into every lesson if this is possible.
    She is also finding this very hard - she has an argument that the children cannot learn if their behaviour/emotional issues/social difficulties are preventing this.
    As she says, how can ONE curriculum fit so many differing needs??
     
  4. What are the targets or the class? If the targets are the same for mainstream then this is unrealistic. Those children who can cope with mainstream are already in there.

    Sooo, go and ask what's expected. If no-one can tell you then change school. My perception (governor of a special school) is that there is different pressures in special schools (the behaviour aspect is quite relentless), but maybe these may suit you better.
     
  5. I work in an autism unit attached to mainstream, the children join in mainstream in a morning and sometimes in an afternoon for P.E or science etc then we are in the unit the rest of the time so we can deal with more specific things the children need. This works quite well most of the time.
     
  6. minnie me

    minnie me Lead commenter

    Does anyone have a better term then 'unit' ? It has such a negative , old fashioned , military connotation .
     
  7. ours is called a resource base
     
  8. minnie me

    minnie me Lead commenter

    Base is good !
     
  9. I'm glad you like it and I agree it's better than unit (as we used to be called)
     
  10. acthell

    acthell New commenter

    Used to be called Base - the in term is Additional Resource Provision.

    Ours works well until the kids go into the mainstream - then they just can't cope! We get all the flack!
     

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