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SEN table top actitivites

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by sunitare, Oct 16, 2015.

  1. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Hi,
    So I've been shortlisted for an interview and need to prepare a 15 minute table top activity to do..my initial thoughts are playing a colours game/ learning a colours song/matching items of different colours ...any suggestions would be appreciated.
     
  2. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    Welcome to special Sunitare.
    What sort of special school have you applied for? What is the chronological age of the students? (e.g. the yer group or key stage), and the ability level / ability range?
    If they are at the early P levels, or have visual difficulties the students may not have developed colour recognition let alone colour naming.
    If you give a little more information I'm sure we can support you o find something really good.
     
  3. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Hi,
    There is only one child, they are 5 but not working on P scales yet (I believe), they are working alone at the moment in the hope of integration into Year R.
    I was told the child does not yet know colours. When I met with them they had lined up lots of toys and I asked what is your fovourite colour..the child replied "boo" (blue)..but they did not point to the blue toys I did. ...So my thought was perhaps just to focus on primary colours, with me modelling saying the colours clearly. For activities I'd thought 1) feeling different coloured playdoh whilst we say it..then 2) placing items from around the table/room onto coloured mats? 3) buildign with the different colours..let's build a blue tower a red tower etc? I've only got 15 mins..I should also begin with some basic rules too???
     
  4. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    This resource offers some ideas http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6053893 BUT as dzil has said you may be ahead of the child if you go for more than one colour. Early sorting of e.g. blue and yellow is a good start. But sort by BLUE and NOT BLUE! using very little speech. I play like this: have lots of blue and yellow sorting toys and one blue pot. Move a blue one towards the pot, compare it to the pot colour, say, 'Yes! Blue!' and pop it in. Then move a yellow one towards the pot and make it very clear it can't go in, 'No - not blue.' Put it to one side. Do a few more, not always alternating colours and then look in the pot. 'Look! Blue! ...Your turn.' It's usually best to hand one to the child until you see things are going well (rather than push the whole pile over). Don't speak all the time - in fact say very little! Waiting and looking expectant is far better than asking/chatting. If a yellow one gets put in, you can look in the pot and go through a pantomime of uh-oh, oh no etc. with suitable facial expressions. But stick with blue/not-blue until you see accurate matching. Obviously give lots of praise for efforts like 'boo'/blue. Just feed back, 'Yes - blue' but don't ask for a repeat. That would be my approach because it would be easy to make it a bit harder if you had instant success, and if the child was totally flummoxed you could only hand blue ones so you have lots of reinforcement of the word! You could also have a blue bit of cloth just in case to put them under and practise 'Gone!' The one-word/one-concept is very important!
     
    dzil likes this.
  5. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Thanks
     
  6. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Very helpful...it's clear I was getting ahead of myself...start simple...less talking and then move on if necessary...I don't know the child's ability to focus...so should I have other activites on the same theme ready ie the playdoh...cars. Etc
     
  7. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    Some really good advice from language. You have You could have some blue play doh ready to use just in case. Then you can put away the blue / not blue activity. (very few words - maybe "bye bye" toys ?) then get out the blue doh and play with the "blue" for a bit. again using only a very few single words.
    You say the student is not working on the P scales yet. The P scales are an assessment tool. They start at the very earliest levels of development - with the child encountering activities and making reflex responses with any response being totally prompted. Your child my not have been assessed, but is certainly working within the P scales. Although the P scales may not be the best or most useful assessment for them.
     
  8. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Yes sorry, you're right the child will be on P scales. I thin kthry are still working on Early learning goals As the advert said I was to have knowledge of p scales/eyfs Ealry learning goals. Froma my brief meeting with the child they could understand simple questions I asked like "what's your favourite colour" what are you looking for ? when working with lego they replied.."a tube" The advice about not too much talking is apt...as when I met them ..I was talking alot and they said "be quiet"..so I asked "do you want me to be quiet"!!! with the response of yes..
    I'm just a little worried this activitiy will be too easy BUT based on what I saw/was told I think it will be ok? fingers crossed ..will let you know tomorrow.
     
  9. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    If the sorting just blue and yellow proves too easy when you start it, add red and green to the mix as you go (from your bag hidden under the table), still sorting "blue and not-blue". Thus showing you can assess and adapt as you go.
    With the doh, it's easy to adapt the level from simply squidging and rolling into 'make one like me' (just using simple words like "make the same" or "you do") You watch the child, then play with the doh alongside the child, then you copy them, then maybe swap some doh then show what you've made and ask "you do?" and so on - moving through the levels of play from solitary play to parallel and maybe even co-operative.
     
  10. sunitare

    sunitare New commenter

    Hi,
    Just to let you know that I got the job ..I start tomorrow!..so thank you all for your help.
     
    Kartoshka likes this.
  11. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    welcome to special sun. Look forward to supporting you in the future.
     

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