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Self funded GTP

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by gemmamarie08, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hiya people!



    Is anyone doing GTP self funded (i.e. school/college paying you) If so how do you go about arranging it? I am doing a degree in Physics and have done work experience at a brilliant sixth form college including teaching some lessons. I want to train in the 14-19 age range in Physics and Electronics so want to ask the college if they would be willing to support me.

    If they do want to support me and I don't get a funded place/they are willing to foot the bill themselves how do we go about arranging this with the provider?



    Sorry for rambling but the info on self funding is so vague!



    Thanks in advance. All advice appreciated!
     
  2. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hiya people!



    Is anyone doing GTP self funded (i.e. school/college paying you) If so how do you go about arranging it? I am doing a degree in Physics and have done work experience at a brilliant sixth form college including teaching some lessons. I want to train in the 14-19 age range in Physics and Electronics so want to ask the college if they would be willing to support me.

    If they do want to support me and I don't get a funded place/they are willing to foot the bill themselves how do we go about arranging this with the provider?



    Sorry for rambling but the info on self funding is so vague!



    Thanks in advance. All advice appreciated!
     
  3. Sorry to burst your bubble but you won't be able to do a GTP in a sixth form college. One of the requirements of gaining QTS is that you're trained to teach in 2 key stages. This isn't possible in a 6th form college as they are only one key stage (KS5 or post-16). As a potential physics teacher you should be very much in demand and have a very good chance of getting a school to take you on. Why do you want to train in a 6th form college? Is there something putting you off training in a school?
     
  4. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hiya, first off thanks for replying. I've researched the GTP and I can do it in a sixth form college as long as they agree to me spending sufficient time in a school. Got that from the official booklet on GTP.

    Anyways, I just feel that I'm better suited to teaching 14-19 year olds. I felt when I did my work experience with this age group that I really bonded with the students and they related to me well. It was certainly the most fun of all! Plus as I said the college I'm hoping to train with has an amazing reputation, it has Beacon Status and has been graded 'outstanding' by Ofsted plus is having a brand new science centre so I can't think of anywhere better to train as a physics teacher. I can also learn how to teach electronics as a second subject which is also in demand.

    I'm just so passionate about physics and teaching it is all I've ever wanted and I feel I have the most empathy with the 14-19 age range and I genuinely beleive I could make a fantastic key stage 4/5 teacher.



    Anyway, anymore advice on this self funded business? Need to know how to go about it and what I have to do.



    Thanks in advance!
     
  5. Hello,

    I don't know if this is something you've considered or would want to consider, but have you thought of applying for a teaching job in the independent sector and then doing your GTP on the job in your 2nd or 3rd year of teaching? Almost all independent schools (those who are members of HMC anyway) have agreed to support any of their teachers who are unqualified but want to gain qualification on the job.

    I know that lots of independent schools are crying out for good physics teachers and if they spot that you have potential, a good number of them will take a chance on you (give you a job, paid at full rate which is often higher that state NQT rate) and then support you should you wish to become qualified (which then opens up the state sector to you).

    Just another idea...
     
  6. gemmamarie08

    gemmamarie08 New commenter

    Hi redwellies,



    didn't know this was an option, any ideas on how to start a search for jobs in the independant sector? Don't have a clue.

    Thanks!
     
  7. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    To clarify- self funding means that the school does not receive the salary grant- Outer London £13,800- but have to fund all the costs of employment therselves.

    The total number of places allocated are limited and there are salary grants available for shortage subjects like Phys . Your local EBITT -see TDA website for an interactive map- can clarify the number of places available and how the recruitment process is organised. They can also advise the school/college about the key requirements and what they have to do to organise the scheme. There are also downloadable publications on the TDA website.

    Getting a school to support you is usually the most difficult bit. You could try asking the EBITT for a list of schools who have previously participated and checking out any Training Schools who tend to get involved in GTP training.


     
  8. On the TES look for physics jobs and then go to 'workplaces' and select 'independent'.

    I went straight from uni to a fully-paid teaching job. I didn't get the first job I applied for... I think it was number 6 or 7 (but 3 of those jobs I wouldn't have taken for all the proverbial tea in China!) but I did get an interview everywhere I applied to. In the end, I had two to choose from, which was nice.

    Make sure your application and supporting statement are good, and remember to emphasise all your outside interests that you'd be willing to offer the school, as independent schools tend to rely on staff to provide an all-round curriculum - if you state that you have a passion for chess, don't be surprised if they ask you to start / help with the school's chess society!

    Good luck - and get cracking now. It's true about the early bird...
     
  9. Try ringing eQualitas if you want help with immediate funding/training ideas, they are very helpful. They work across south London and into the south east.



    Good luck.
     
  10. In a nut shell, self funded places have all cost met by the school which include salary (approx £21,000) and training fees (approx £5,000).
    A funded place would usually include the training fee and a salary grant of £17,000 to which the school adds the difference to make it up to at least Unqualified scale 1 (£21k) therefore costing the school only £4,000 for a teacher for a year.... what a bargain for the school!

     

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