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Seeking Physics Ideas

Discussion in 'Science' started by hanmphillips, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Hi,
    After several years using TES this is my first post and I am hoping to create a place where we can share simple and effective ideas for teaching Physics. Mainly short demos or pratical ideas that help students visualise what is going on, often with more complex concepts, particularly at KS4 and 5. I find so many teachers have such brilliant ideas that they have devloped over the years but sharing them all, even with in a department, can be time conusming and is often not seen as a priority.I am hoping this will help other Physics teachers as well as myself. Even if you don't think your idea is new or exciting, but is a favourite activity never fails to enagage pupils or help their understanding please post it up here. It is bound to be new to somebody.
    So to start it off...

    Induction. Attracting a diet coke can with a charged rod
    Centre of mass: creating balancing birds andbalancing coke cans on their edge.
    Lenzes Law: magnet falling through a copper tube and repelling rings
    Electric motor: Create a large model of a motor out of card, label field lines etc and use the LHR to help pupils see the need for the split ring.
     
  2. Hi,
    After several years using TES this is my first post and I am hoping to create a place where we can share simple and effective ideas for teaching Physics. Mainly short demos or pratical ideas that help students visualise what is going on, often with more complex concepts, particularly at KS4 and 5. I find so many teachers have such brilliant ideas that they have devloped over the years but sharing them all, even with in a department, can be time conusming and is often not seen as a priority.I am hoping this will help other Physics teachers as well as myself. Even if you don't think your idea is new or exciting, but is a favourite activity never fails to enagage pupils or help their understanding please post it up here. It is bound to be new to somebody.
    So to start it off...

    Induction. Attracting a diet coke can with a charged rod
    Centre of mass: creating balancing birds andbalancing coke cans on their edge.
    Lenzes Law: magnet falling through a copper tube and repelling rings
    Electric motor: Create a large model of a motor out of card, label field lines etc and use the LHR to help pupils see the need for the split ring.
     
  3. This is an excellent idea!

    Perhaps, if the TES goes through with their idea of allowing us to create user groups and blogs on the TES site, there could be a group dedicated to this purpose.


    Some tips:


    (1) For fifteen quid, you can get a purpose-made device for demonstrating Lenz's Law, with an opening cut in the copper tube so your students can see the iron slug slowly descending through the tube, here:


    http://www.grand-illusions.com/acatalog/Lenz_s_Law_Demo.html



    This shop has a number of "science toys" which can be useful for grabbing the attention of your students: the "fun fly stick" for electrostatic repulsion, the "Gaussian gun" for conservation of momentum, Stirling engines, etc.


    (2) The society of American physics teachers (or some such group) has a book with a collection of plans for cheap self-made apparatus for doing physics demos. I can't put my hands on my copy at the moment but when I find it I'll post the reference.


    (3) Although it's not a book about apparatus, "The Flying Circus of Physics" by Jearl Walker (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flying-Circus-Physics-Answers/dp/9812530800/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324545702&sr=8-2 ) has lots of interesting "physics puzzles" (example: if the ocean were filled with mercury, would waves move faster or slower or the same speed as they do through water). Posing one of these at the start of every class, with the answer given at the next class, is a great way to keep students interested in physics.
     
  4. Can anyone tell me how to get line breaks into my posts, so I can break up my contributions into readable paragraphs?
     
  5. lunarita

    lunarita Established commenter

    Use the angled brackets around the letter p



    If I do it here you won't see it.....

    For some reason TES doesn't seem to like Google chrome
     
  6. Thanks!
    Do other HTML tags work as well? Like emboldening?
     
  7. Orion

    Orion New commenter

    Why not just use youtube and do it all by video + the IOP site you can contribute to that too
     

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