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Secondary Mathematics - Go For It? (Job Shortages)

Discussion in 'Scotland - prospective teachers' started by gary_stirling, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. Hello guys,
    I'm pretty new to these forums, hope you can give me some help.
    In May I'm due to finish University. I've been studying for a Bachelor of Accountancy with Mathematics, I'm in my Honours year and I'm hopeful of getting a 2:1.
    I've been thinking for a while of applying to do teacher training to become a secondary Mathematics teacher - although my degree's in two subjects Mathematics is the one I enjoy the most, and I have been tutoring school pupils over the past three years and have an excellent record of getting them through their exams with good grades. I've really enjoyed teaching them as well and I've had a lot of praise from these pupils and their parents for making Maths seem interesting and accessable.
    I've got my application in and my University tutor has just completed my reference.
    However I'm not sure whether to go ahead with the application or not. Although I would love to be a Mathematics teacher, my fiancee has been one of the unfortunate souls who graduated as a primary teacher three years ago and has since struggled to find any kind of work whatsoever, struggling by on the odd supply day here and there, which are drying up even further due to the sheer amount of prospective primary teachers there are - I'm sure you all know what the situation is like.
    I had heard that secondary does not have the same vast numbers of prospective teachers, and that mathematics especially is a subject that is quite in demand throughout the country (I'm willing to move elsewhere in Britain or even abroad once qualified) - but from what I am hearing this is becoming less and less the case, particularly with local authority cuts.
    So my question is - do I go for it or not? The last thing I want is to graduate and struggle for work - I just want to be in work and able to teach. But I'm not sure if I should go for it this year (meaning I'd be doing my teacher training in 2011-12 and probationary year in 2012-13) or to hold off for a couple of years and see if the situation improves.
    Any of you guys in a similar boat and could offer any advice? It would be greatly appreciated.
    Cheers!
     
  2. Hello guys,
    I'm pretty new to these forums, hope you can give me some help.
    In May I'm due to finish University. I've been studying for a Bachelor of Accountancy with Mathematics, I'm in my Honours year and I'm hopeful of getting a 2:1.
    I've been thinking for a while of applying to do teacher training to become a secondary Mathematics teacher - although my degree's in two subjects Mathematics is the one I enjoy the most, and I have been tutoring school pupils over the past three years and have an excellent record of getting them through their exams with good grades. I've really enjoyed teaching them as well and I've had a lot of praise from these pupils and their parents for making Maths seem interesting and accessable.
    I've got my application in and my University tutor has just completed my reference.
    However I'm not sure whether to go ahead with the application or not. Although I would love to be a Mathematics teacher, my fiancee has been one of the unfortunate souls who graduated as a primary teacher three years ago and has since struggled to find any kind of work whatsoever, struggling by on the odd supply day here and there, which are drying up even further due to the sheer amount of prospective primary teachers there are - I'm sure you all know what the situation is like.
    I had heard that secondary does not have the same vast numbers of prospective teachers, and that mathematics especially is a subject that is quite in demand throughout the country (I'm willing to move elsewhere in Britain or even abroad once qualified) - but from what I am hearing this is becoming less and less the case, particularly with local authority cuts.
    So my question is - do I go for it or not? The last thing I want is to graduate and struggle for work - I just want to be in work and able to teach. But I'm not sure if I should go for it this year (meaning I'd be doing my teacher training in 2011-12 and probationary year in 2012-13) or to hold off for a couple of years and see if the situation improves.
    Any of you guys in a similar boat and could offer any advice? It would be greatly appreciated.
    Cheers!
     
  3. Hi gary
    Secondary teaching is not really my area of expertise but i just thought i'd reply. My cousin graduated as a maths teacher 2 years ago & has not found anything permanent. She has however found lots of supply/temp contract work in the strathclyde region. I think good maths teachers are something a LOT of schools are crying out for. There are retirement packages being offered right now for primary & secondary teachers so i think there should be a few jobs up for grabs in the next couple of years. Also, where i live - the western isles, they are ALWAYS looking for maths teachers as the ones they have, are from my personal exp - rubbish. & even if you don't get a job right away, you could always advertise yourself as a maths tutor, something many parents are willing to pay for. I am applying for primary this year, despite the job situation, as i have desperately wanted to do it since i was a little girl, and if its something you really want to do, go for it.
     
  4. I went into teaching in 2001, just as the "demographic timebomb" publicity was reaching its height and just as the "demographic timebomb" was allegedly going to happen. I found a permanent job through a combination of circumstances, eg luck and the fact that there were actual job vacancies at the time.
    Ten years later I would not train to become a teacher because (1) there are no permanent jobs, (2) there are unlikely to be any permanent jobs in the next few years, (3) if anything, the number of teachers will fall over the next few years. If you are willing to work abroad then, of course, the situations will be entirely different in each country.
    It's up to you at the end of the day, your choice.
     

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