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Scottish v English PG - the benefits - your thoughts please

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by Brainboxfood, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Hi
    I'm from Scotland and recently moved to England, although I will be eventually be returning to Scotland it may not be for some time. Do you know of any reasons why i might favour a Scottish PG v English PG? I've heard England favours Scottish trained teachers is this a myth? Also that Scottish system is tougher and more therefore more respected?

    Also does anyone know if its feasible to do the PG in Scotland and then do probation in England? I will be resettling in Scotland so really am looking to improve my prospects of getting a job here eventually.

    thanks in advance for your thoughts.
     
  2. Hi
    I'm from Scotland and recently moved to England, although I will be eventually be returning to Scotland it may not be for some time. Do you know of any reasons why i might favour a Scottish PG v English PG? I've heard England favours Scottish trained teachers is this a myth? Also that Scottish system is tougher and more therefore more respected?

    Also does anyone know if its feasible to do the PG in Scotland and then do probation in England? I will be resettling in Scotland so really am looking to improve my prospects of getting a job here eventually.

    thanks in advance for your thoughts.
     
  3. If you train in Scotland you will get your probation year in Scotland. You could of course opt out and see how you get on getting an NQT post in England but there won't be anywhere reserved for you obviously.

    The scottish pgde is 'tougher' because they insist on a minimum of 90 days work placement, whereas in English courses it's not the case (as far as I'm aware English universities have the freedom to choose how much the placements are, but anyone can correct me if I'm wrong there).

    Until recently, the Scottish education system was highly regarded internationally. This year, however, it has increasingly become a farce.

    If you are returning to Scotland eventually anyway, I'd say you were better off training here, but even if it improves your chances of getting a job, the chances are still pretty slim anyway.
     
  4. Yes, you can do your NQT year in England if you train in Scotland and yes, it's pretty easy to transfer the Scottish qualification to work in England. It is possible to do it the other way around but, should you return to Scotland to work, in such a competitive job market you'd be at a disadvantage compared to people who already knew the Scottish curriculum and exam system. I'd think about the long term consequences and where you ultimately want to work.
     
  5. Yes England does favour Scottish trained teachers because at one time the education system (and training) up here was superior. No longer the case I'm afraid. They've improved things a lot down south, meanwhile up here things have 'slipped' shall we say. I have experience of both and my kids have been educated both. However, should you train and work down south and return to Scotland don't be surprised if some suggest you might need to be 'retrained' in order to cope with the far superior and unique Scottish Education System! Having bought into the 'myth' myself for so long I'm afraid it now makes my blood boil!
     
  6. piglet171

    piglet171 New commenter

    Totally agree.You could be me....!
     
  7. Yes Piglet, I must confess to having noticed some similarities! The problem is not enough of us return home to debunk the
    myth. The arrogance when it comes to education is appalling. And what have we ended up with? The Curriculum for Excellence! More like the curriculum for how far up our own arrogant channels we can go kind of curriculum. Oh how the Scottish press scoffed when they introduced the National Curriculum down south twenty years ago. What we need is for someone to stand up, point the finger at us and sing "Donald, where's yer troosers"
     

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