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Scottish Exam Results up by 14% on 2019

Discussion in 'Personal' started by florian gassmann, Aug 11, 2020.

  1. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Following a statement by Scottish Education Secretary John Swinney, the moderation of this year's exam resultss has been removed, and the raw teacher estimates allowed to stand, resulting in this year's results being an unprecedented 14% higher than last year's results.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-53740588
     
  2. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    And now, in something of a panic, the UK government has said that students can use their mock results as the basis of an appeal against the grades they will be awarded tomorrow.
     
  3. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Star commenter

    I applaud the Scottish government for holding their hands up , admitting they had got it wrong and acting to put things right. The press have branded it a humiliation, but how refreshing it would be to see our government actually apologise when they get things wrong, rather than maintaining the same "world beating" claims for their course of action.
    Here in England (and Wales and NI), the government should cede to teachers' estimated grades. So what if they are slightly inflated. Give these kids a break; they have suffered enough over the past few months and face an uncertain economic future. Let them soak up the surplus university places that overseas students won't be taking. Give them a chance to shape their futures so that when they emerge into a post-Covid world, fingers crossed, they have half a chance to thrive. What else is there for them? Their future is otherwise so bleak.
     
  4. border_walker

    border_walker Lead commenter

    Having moderated teacher marked work for exam boards, my experience over a number of years was:
    The majority of A level teachers could be relied upon to more or less get it right.
    The vast majority of GCSE teachers could be relied upon to grossly over mark. In the worst example I remember a downgrade from 80% to 20%.
     
    newposter likes this.
  5. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    Teachers cannot be trusted with this. We had once chance and we blew it as a 'profession'. Yet watch lots of them moaning and whining about the 'nasty government'. We want to be treated as a profession yet we have inflated predictions as soon as we're given the chance.
     
    border_walker likes this.
  6. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    I think slight inflation would be understandable and acceptable, but the increase of 14 percentage points for Scottish Highers is not "slight inflation" - it represents a massive easing of grade boundaries.
     
  7. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    When I marked A level (some time ago, admittedly), ULEAC (Edexcel) took no notice of teacher estimates at any level because they were deemed to be too inaccurate. There was a feeling back then that well-meaning teachers of weaker students were too prone to give high grades because they felt their students had done their best irrespective of whether they had achieved the required standard for the grade. These days, now that markschemes are published and exam inset is common, teacher estimates might be more accurate, but I don't know.

    Some boards (Oxford & Cambridge was one) would automatically remark anyone who achieved a grade two or more grades below their teacher's estimate, but Edexcel preferred to remark anyone very close to the border because they felt the estimates were too unreliable.
     
  8. Morninglover

    Morninglover Star commenter

    So we can either trust the teachers and results go up, or the algorithm and results go down (especially for the most able students in low performing schools). Or we can use mocks which, as we all know, vary hugely from school to school as to how they are set, sat and assessed

    What a mess. Anyone would think this has just happened, rather than been known about since March...
     
    smoothnewt likes this.
  9. Morninglover

    Morninglover Star commenter


    Please explain.
     
  10. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    Every single department in my school got 'best ever' results, including a couple which spent the last two years in negative progress. Massive coincidence hey?
     
  11. smoothnewt

    smoothnewt Star commenter

    So what do you see as a solution? The Government's dodgy algorithm? These 18 year olds deserve the best outcome and support possible, imo, if they are to stand a chance of getting anywhere over the next few years.
     
  12. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    I do not begrudge the kids at all, but it frustrating to say the least that teachers are all set to moan and whine, when they have basically caused this problem by submitting record results.
     
    border_walker likes this.
  13. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    I agree, but they won't be getting the best outcome if they end up with results that are 14% higher than the norm. They will simply be getting a devalued qualification.
     
    newposter likes this.

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