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Science and English?

Discussion in 'Science' started by tactfulteacher, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. I've just taken on an English class once a week to top up my hours of teaching so I am not one under, and I wanted to encorporate English and Science together in that lesson - does anyone have any ideas what I can do with the group? They are a year 8 foundation class and I pretty much have free scope as to what I do!
     
  2. I've just taken on an English class once a week to top up my hours of teaching so I am not one under, and I wanted to encorporate English and Science together in that lesson - does anyone have any ideas what I can do with the group? They are a year 8 foundation class and I pretty much have free scope as to what I do!
     
  3. AshgarMary

    AshgarMary New commenter

    How about taking some of the Public Understanding of Science or bad science items, or a big science incident such as Hiroshima, Chernobyl or even something like solar power and then getting the students to plan some kind of communication around that - documentary, newspaper article, dramatisation?

    What skills do you want to develop in English?
    What skills in science?

    This might give you some ideas: http://www.prel.org/picturingscience/index.asp
     
  4. I suggest you show your post to the Head of English - you might find you get your free lesson back. [​IMG]
     
  5. I like physics_suits_you's answer!
    ... I wonder what an English teacher would do if asked to top up his timetable hours with a science class? Have you put this question to the English thread?

    There may be science poems you could look at.
    There are definitley words that are used differently in and out of the science domain. You could possibly look at these (mass, weight, work, energy, force, pressure, moment, acidic, freezing, cold, etc etc).
    There may be BBC science reports / videos (John Craven's Newsround type stuff) that you could look at & analyse the language / message / delivery style.
    Compare the different styles of a science or documentary article / programme with a purely entertainment one.

    .

     
  6. See if you can get hold of the ATLAS materials - these are about 30y old (so ancient, like me) and contained approx 20 activities which took you through analysis of scientific paragraphs to writing meaningful explanations. They were aimed at Y7, as an introduction to scientific writing.
    Do you use CASE in your Science lessons? There are a few activities there which involve reading and writing, although some may be above their ability level. You might be able to demo the experiments, if you do not have full class sets.
    Consider spelling tests BUT ensure you provide the pupils with PRINTED (checked!) lists - I got very cross with my Y7 daughter who insisted she had copied a French word correctly off the board, then got it wrong by spelling it as she had learnt it! Ask other departments for words that the pupils will be using in that year (earn Brownie points).
    Think about the words : cow, cat, dog, bee. You could work out which one was which, just from its silhouette, so long as it is written in lower case, with good risers and descenders. Longer words get more fun. Take a paragraph from a book and convert a few words into silhouettes: pupils use the context of the paragraph to work out suitable possibilities.
    For an easy life, start and end each lesson with 10 minutes of silent reading.
    Read a story to them - a classic like Jules Verne or some modern science fiction. Ask them to report on your presentation and their understanding of events - they think they're "having a go" at you, but in reality they are concentrating and using their writing skills. Perhaps this could be done using video technology, to make it more interesting.
    Find out about BBC Young Reporters.

     
  7. What size is the group and what are their targets
    I assume foundation equates to lower academic ability and some interesting AENs
    What reading age are they- Speaking age- Spelling age- What are their V and NV Cat scores
    These will all impact on what you can do with them-
    Do you have access to the library with them?
    And what does the English department SoW outline that their age and abilitry should be doing?
    And finally, have you been given them because you have great pupil management skills and will be able to keep a lid on them.
    Good luck!
     

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