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'Schools need to end the fad diet approach to SEND provision'

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by TES_Rosaline, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. TES_Rosaline

    TES_Rosaline Administrator Staff Member

  2. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    Schools can ' capacity build ' re accommodating the needs of children with SEND .They need to invest in making the skills of the Teaching Assistants 'fit for purpose ' - with the right CPD they can deliver specialist provision. I think also that some schools are very creative in adapting and matching interventions to address the needs of individuals and co horts but it takes integrity, drive and focus. It is easier (but not necessarily effective ) to buy in ready made programmes. Agree that too many settings settle on a quick fix - shallow and lacking impact.

    Consider an (alternative) Weight Watchers model re SEND provision.

    Long term goals
    Small steps
    Perseverance
    Collegiate responsibilty
    Celebrate success
     
  3. onmyknees

    onmyknees Established commenter

    Far too many "SEND" children are still the result of shockingly bad teaching in my opinion. Differentiation and Mastery are swept aside, in order to push children on so that they meet unrealistic expectations. If this continues week after month after year, the gap gets wider and wider. Poor training of SEND in Teacher Training must take a large part of the blame. As SENCO I spend a huge amount of my time mending teaching rather than learning.
     
    dani9tho and minnie me like this.
  4. circuskevin

    circuskevin Established commenter

    I have never need to diet ... more the opposite.

    The local kids spotted me as the 'Stick Insect Man' on TV once.

    Kevin the Clown
     
  5. circuskevin

    circuskevin Established commenter

    I often see the more severe special needs kids in primary schools on 1:1 not doing an awful lot. Quite often I think they would be better off in special schools.

    I must contact this Jeremy fella and have a chat with him. See if he likes any of my ideas on mobility needs and other ways to positively interact with these kids.

    Kevin the Clown
     

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