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School visit

Discussion in 'Senior Leadership Team' started by oldskool71, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. oldskool71

    oldskool71 New commenter

    I am visiting a school next week in advance of applying for a job there.
    What would the school be looking for from me to suggest that I might be a good candidate to invite for interview apart from smart dress and general enthusiasm?
     
  2. oldskool71

    oldskool71 New commenter

    I am visiting a school next week in advance of applying for a job there.
    What would the school be looking for from me to suggest that I might be a good candidate to invite for interview apart from smart dress and general enthusiasm?
     
  3. I read the school's latest Ofsted report and asked specific questions. I also make sure I make the appointment to look round when the children are there. No better way to get a feel of a school than when it's "up and running".
    I asked about how many children with EAL were in the school and what provision the school was making for them. I asked questions about the team I would be managing. How many teachers, how many TA's, cover supervisors, HLTA's etc. That led on to asking about the staffing structure further up the school.
    I asked questions about the socio-economic background of the children. For example, percentage of FSM. I asked if there were learning mentors, family workers, counsellors, etc.
    I made positive comments about things I noticed about classrooms. For example, all of the classrooms had similar target boards - I commented on the consistency across the classes and asked about how the year groups planned together.
    I wanted to show that I wasn't just a class teacher but that I was the next member of their senior leadership team. For example, I was interested to know how they taught phonics in the school, but didn't ask that as although an important question, I didn't feel at the time that it would make me stand out as a leader. (unless of course I was applying to be their literacy leader!!)
    More importantly than asking questions though was that I listened to what the head was saying as she showed me around. I made sure I was dressed well but not overdressed - after all, this wasn't the interview. I wore clothes that I would wear for school, but made sure the trousers weren't dropping the hems! I also made sure that I was wearing make up (not too much) and that I had nice perfume on (not too much of that either).
    When I show people round the school now, I watch out for their dress and overall appearance, I like it if they smell nice but that their perfume is not overpowering, I expect people to listen attentively to what I am saying about the school - after all, I am showing them the best bits - and that they are able to respond appropriately to what I am saying - not just reeling off a list of questions. I also like potential interview candidates to show that they have researched into the school a little bit. (e.g. Ofsted report)
    I save all of the talking about pedagogy stuff for the interview. Unless asked of course.
     
  4. oldskool71

    oldskool71 New commenter

    Thanks very much for the detailed answer.

    Would you describe the school visit then as a `filtering out' exercise?
     
  5. oldskool71

    oldskool71 New commenter

    The visit was very worthwhile and I will make sure I do a school visit for any jobs I apply for if I don't get this job. I came away sure I could work with the HT and with a clear idea of the strengths and weaknesses of the school, which will obviously be a great help writing the application.
     

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