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school uniform policy

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Jude73, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. I was wondering if I could have some advice/ your opinions about my son. He'll be starting Y11 soon but last year had problems regarding school uniform policy. He is quite 'advanced' for his age and grew a beard, the headteacher has told him he needs to shave every day or he will be placed in the 'quiet room' or excluded. My son has pointed out other students who have previously grown beards and that it is not part of the school policy. My son has become very stubborn on this matter, I've explained that it is part of growing up but he sees it as his 'right.'
     
  2. I was wondering if I could have some advice/ your opinions about my son. He'll be starting Y11 soon but last year had problems regarding school uniform policy. He is quite 'advanced' for his age and grew a beard, the headteacher has told him he needs to shave every day or he will be placed in the 'quiet room' or excluded. My son has pointed out other students who have previously grown beards and that it is not part of the school policy. My son has become very stubborn on this matter, I've explained that it is part of growing up but he sees it as his 'right.'
     
  3. Do you want him to conform or do you want to fight the school?
    What is the actual school policy?
    For certain religions a beard is mandatory so the school policy could well be a form of discrimination.
    I'm with your son on this, as long as it is neat what is the school's problem?
    Is this him/you?
    http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/9131858.Ribble_Valley_boy_banned_from_class_for_having_a_beard/?action=complain&cid=9500326



     
  4. Hi Sashh,
    the school policy only states that boys hair must not be longer than collar length and it is a catholic school. I just feel awkward because I am a teacher and also am employed on a casula basis with the exam team.
    It isn't us on the news report, I feel it is difficult as students as encouraged to have their own opinions with valid reasons etc and for the life of me I can't see why no beard! Admittedly it was a little patchy but trimmed, since shaving morning and night he now has a proper beard and rivals alot of the male teachers!
     
  5. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I can't really offer any advice, but I'd like to offer support. A school expecting an 11 year old to shave just because he is a bit more physically mature than others seems ludicrous to me. What do they do with "well-developed" girls? Bind their chests? Do they expect tall children to walk on their knees?
     
  6. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Apologies, minnie. In my defence, you down south should remember that there are actually different systems in the UK, and the term "Year 11" means nothing up here. I saw 11, misread 11 years old. In fact, he is S4 in the real world (!).
     
  7. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I'd like to know in what way having a beard makes him an undesirable pupil. Do pupils who have beards behave worse than pupils who do not? Or is this merely an arbitrary "rule" imposed by a bureaucratic management who can't be flexible. What difference does it make? In a world where we're trying to create good citizens of our pupils, "Because I said so" just doesn't cut it any more. Nor should it.
     
  8. My son did start shaving when he was aged 11 but as he has aged is now more developed! He does accept that he should comply with school rules but is more confused about it as other students in year 11 have had them. He already works at weekends and holidays, he went along to work voluntary at the local football ground and due to his enthusiasm and commitment is now paid, has references ready for the college course he wants to do (sports turf management) when he leaves school as well as an apprenticeship pretty much sorted. My point is he doesn't do anything because he is just a 'silly teenager' - yes he does have his moments but on the whole is ready to leave and work with adults.
     
  9. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    It sounds like your son is a credit to his school. What a pity they have a stick up their unmentionables over something so silly as the normal growth patterns of young men.
     
  10. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    All of that, though a credit to him and to you, makes no difference at all. He is a pupil at the school and therefore does need to follow the directions of the headteacher while at school, end of story.
     
  11. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    It's a daft rule.
    But it is what the Head wants.
    So you'll have to go along with it.
    You can't choose to go along with some things but not others (written down or not). The alternative would be leaving the school which would obviously be totally ridiculous.
    At least he's in year 11 and has less than a full school year to go.

    All the best to both of you.
     
  12. Thanks everyone for all your opinions! My son is growing a beard over the hols but I suspect will soon be very itchy and gone again. He will comply with the school Head and accepts that even in the workplace there are rules which may seem unfair but c'est la vie! Everyone has to do things they don't like at some point.
     
  13. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I really don't wish to start an argument, Mr B, especially as the OP has found a sensible solution. However, would be happy advising STAFF to just follow daft rules imposed by the HT that weren't written down?
     
  14. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Schools are not democracies though and all are not equal. Children are asked to / expected to do all kinds of things that staff are not.

    Though actually, most of us do have a clause in our job description that says something like 'any other request of the headteacher'. Perhaps that clause should go into those home-school contract things?
     
  15. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Looks like minnie answered this one for me. I'd like to dye my hair an 'unnatural' colour (wouldn't be the first time) but my current Head doesn't allow it so I have to go along with it. Personally I don't feel it would affect my ability to do the job.
    If I felt the Head was asking staff to do something totally unfair or in breach of their contract then I'd go and see him about it (I'm a union rep) and take it from there.
    That said I'd also echo minnie's statement that adults and children are not the same.
     
  16. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    See I often wonder about this. Mine is dyed (to cover the grey I think I am too young to have) but only a normalish colour. I often think I would like a nice grass green, just for the experience. Have no idea what my HT would say, but I can't imagine him thinking it was ok or 'allowing' it. Mind you hair colour isn't actually written down in the dress code part of the code of conduct...
     
  17. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I think it might be the exact opposite of your point...

    You said that it is a daft rule that isn't written down and teachers wouldn't be expected to comply with unwritten expectations from the headteacher. Actually we are and hair colour is the example given.

    I would not say that 'having a beard' necessarily does harm, however going against the wishes of the person in charge of the community most certainly does. And seeing it as one's right to do as one pleases, regardless of the wishes of the person in charge very much does as well.
     
  18. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    I agree.
    I also agree with pupils following the rules set down by the Head/school.
     
  19. I agree with the other posters in that he really has to conform, it will make life easier.
    But my sense of divelment would take over and I'd ask if they would ban Jesus from the school. I'd write to the governers and ask the same question - yes I know in real life it is not that simple.

    I went to a catholic school and we had some stupid rules. You were not allowed to wear a plain chain around your neck on grounds of health and safety. We were also not allowed to wear a chain with a pendant on it. We were however allowed to wear a cross or religeous medal on a chain. For some reason that wasn't a health and safety issue.


     
  20. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Because God would protect you, perhaps?
     

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