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school in SM, behaviour getting worse!

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by starfluf, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. Hi all. My school was put into SM last year, with new Head just starting that year. Ofsted gave the head benefit of the doubt of issues not being the head's fault. We are now a year into SM and many staff have left, resigned, been suspended or are off on sick. My dilemma is Ofsted may well see good teaching but behaviour becoming more manic, especially outside the classroom. Students ignore requests from SLT so classroom teachers don't have a prayer. I won't go into detail incase anyone could pin point this to a specific school. Should staff whistle blow when they fear for their own safety and sanity? Surely by now behaviour should have been addressed?
     
  2. Hi all. My school was put into SM last year, with new Head just starting that year. Ofsted gave the head benefit of the doubt of issues not being the head's fault. We are now a year into SM and many staff have left, resigned, been suspended or are off on sick. My dilemma is Ofsted may well see good teaching but behaviour becoming more manic, especially outside the classroom. Students ignore requests from SLT so classroom teachers don't have a prayer. I won't go into detail incase anyone could pin point this to a specific school. Should staff whistle blow when they fear for their own safety and sanity? Surely by now behaviour should have been addressed?
     
  3. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Yes.
    And rectified. Your new head bears the responsibility. I suggest you get out of there.
     
  4. thanks for your reply. Some have left without a job to go to they are that desperate. And another may be resigning. What pains me is this isn't the school it was - I'm an ex-student! I'm devastated it has come to this.
     
  5. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    I do sympathise. I would argue that no school suddenly finds itself in special measures. It is led there by a mixture of cluelessnesss, crackpot ideas, ineptitude and a refusal to recognise the problem and deal with it. If your SLT is routinely ignored, as you say you have no chance. What's the governing body doing when it should be governing?
     
  6. Governing body has no power as we're in SM. I do not feel empowered to challenge students behaviour outside of my classroom. False accusations are threatened and carried out. We have ofsted in and many staff are hoping they will recognise the problems good teachers are facing with the behaviour. If not then its a cover-up. The previous Head was more empowering with behaviour issues than the current one.
     
  7. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    I can only repeat the earlier advice: leave as soon as you can. It is no longer the school it was and you have to find something bette for yourself. Do what is right for you.
     
  8. Thankyou - I have been frequenting TES for jobs in the area, alas none at the mo.
     
  9. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    I used to work in a school like this. It was in SM.
    Colleagues who are still there say it's no better than it was before, but now it's Good with Outstanding features.
    Some inspectors are easier to fool than others.
     
  10. Well..... I already had a false allegation and with the stance the Head has that was almost an automatic suspension!!

    Gardening Leaves - behaviour within my area is generally under control. Certainly within the classroom and in our corridor (which is like a cul-de-sac) we are OK. We insist on proper uniform to enter the classroom, and the instances of damage to equipment has lowered since returning to one lunch instead of split lunch. Luckily because we are an option subject, we don't generally have the behaviour issues some of our core colleagues have.

    The big problem is break and lunch times - we have a new school which wasn't planned very well. The students have no boundaries. Take this week with the snow, there was no guidelines as to what they could and couldn't do. Students were pelting the building, SLT, whoever - pure anarchy. I know of no other school where the students don't have consequences. Then a last minute letter on behaviour is put together as ofted phoned that day and came in two days later. Worryingly Ofsted think we have average behaviour as no one dared speak up...... I've been told not to '**** on your own doorstep' - but surely thing can only get better if the truth is out not covered up?????
     
  11. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    The situation you describe mirrors one in a school where I worked. We scraped through Ofsted as barely satsifactory a few years ago and the head convinced himself and no one else that this was due to his strong leadership. It was the worst possible result, because while he was clinging to his bunker mentality parents voted with their feet.
    That school is now closed because of falling rolls.
     

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