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School dress code for teachers.

Discussion in 'Independent' started by barries, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. I have to ask, does your school have a dress code for teachers? is it formal or an anything goes kind of style?
    I have to ask because I am getting embroiled in a discussion where I am being told St. Trinians is in a different universe and that they are possibly even breaking the law in stipulating a dress code for staff.
    It especially applies to female staff because of the modesty factor I suppose.
    Women teachers must wear a formal office wear. Either a suit skirt and jacket, , or a formal trouser suit . If you wear a skirt ( below knee length) you can wear a cardigan instead of a jacket.
    Shoes must have a sensible heel and be court shoes if wearing a skirt. Trouser shoes are acceptable for a trouser suit. No trainers or similar.
    Tops must cover cleavage and décolleté and must be long enough to cover midriff ( no flesh showing there) so no crop tops etc. Short or long sleeves are preferred rather than no sleeve tops. Can be a blouse or a jumper or any other top.
    Men must wear a suit and a shirt and tie and must have these done up at all times unless the HT has given the order so ties can be removed and a top button on the shirt opened ( in hot weather). Shoes for men must be clean and polished and not informal. No trainers etc.
    Hair. for men should be short but the rule is actually hair will be kept off the shoulders. For women that means tied up or tied back ( or short)
    Is my school unusual in doing this? I have to ask because some people think I am working in a parallel universe.
     
  2. I have to ask, does your school have a dress code for teachers? is it formal or an anything goes kind of style?
    I have to ask because I am getting embroiled in a discussion where I am being told St. Trinians is in a different universe and that they are possibly even breaking the law in stipulating a dress code for staff.
    It especially applies to female staff because of the modesty factor I suppose.
    Women teachers must wear a formal office wear. Either a suit skirt and jacket, , or a formal trouser suit . If you wear a skirt ( below knee length) you can wear a cardigan instead of a jacket.
    Shoes must have a sensible heel and be court shoes if wearing a skirt. Trouser shoes are acceptable for a trouser suit. No trainers or similar.
    Tops must cover cleavage and décolleté and must be long enough to cover midriff ( no flesh showing there) so no crop tops etc. Short or long sleeves are preferred rather than no sleeve tops. Can be a blouse or a jumper or any other top.
    Men must wear a suit and a shirt and tie and must have these done up at all times unless the HT has given the order so ties can be removed and a top button on the shirt opened ( in hot weather). Shoes for men must be clean and polished and not informal. No trainers etc.
    Hair. for men should be short but the rule is actually hair will be kept off the shoulders. For women that means tied up or tied back ( or short)
    Is my school unusual in doing this? I have to ask because some people think I am working in a parallel universe.
     
  3. Hmmm.....granted I dont have a massive amount of experience in school but that does seem a tad harsh.
    The killer for me would be the wearing of a suit with tie and shirt fully done up...... I really would hate that I must say.
    The suprising thing is that in a lot of schools (and the workplace in general TBF) the women get away with absolute murder when it comes to dress code!
     
  4. Snorkers

    Snorkers New commenter

    Our sixth form wear suits and we are expected to dress in a similar manner, although our regulations aren't quite as prescriptive as your school's rules. Women wear skirt/dress/trousers with a jacket (no jumpers or cardigans allowed, sadly); men wear suit and tie. Jackets on and men's tie/top buttons definitely done up unless in shirt sleeve order in the summer time. So far as I know there are no rules about hair, although no-one has such outlandish coiffure that might cause raised eyebrows!
     
  5. peterdevon

    peterdevon New commenter

    I'd be surprised if an independent school did not have a dress code. We are in a competetive business. Maintaining student and parent confidence is essential. Staff dressing to a certain code might help with that.
     
  6. We have a dress code that is not as prescriptive as yours *******. However, we are expected to wear clothes suitable for office wear. The men are expected to wear suits and ties, and wear them properly. I don't know of any schools that don't expect men to wear suits properly, although I expect there are some. I have long hair and wear it down (unless we are using Bunsen burners). The standard of dress at my school is a lot more 'professional' than my old school, where women teachers could get away with a lot of things. I say women, because the men were still expected to wear suits and ties. The dress at my school fits in with the atmosphere at the school somehow. Though the HT wouldn't let us wear our own clothes on 'own clothes day'. I would find it hard to conform to ******* tight code, though, as I don't wear suits. I don't feel the need to dress as a man to compete in the work place. I know all the arguments for a woman wearing a suit, and I kind of agree with some, but it's not me.
     
  7. Sorry LondonChap, yet another 'difference' between the real world and schools you will just have to get used to. (And some of them take a lot of getting used to!)
     

  8. sixth formers have to wear a suit /tie (boys), jacket/no visible flesh (girls) and staff are supposed to follow suit, tho it is easier for women - I quite often wear dress/boots with a jacket to pop on for assembly etc and that looks fine. I used to work in a comp (supposedly good) where the drama teacher used to wear jeans + rock band t shirts and the head of r.e. used to wear velour track suits with flip flops, I think the students appreciate it if it looks like you have made a bit of an effort.
     
  9. LOLOL!.....Tell me about it!
    Every other day I come across something that makes me go "You are kidding right?!"..... Oh well... onwards and upwards as they say!
    Although there does appear to be one overwhelming similarity between my 'new world' and 'old world'..... management who hire staff on the basis of their ability and then proceed to stand over their shoulder, watch their every move and try and basically dictate how they should be doing things!!
    On my placements.... 'Lack of trust'..... this is the No1 gripe amongst the teaching staff...
     
  10. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Well, Barrie, this takes the biscuit!
    I had a very simple dress code: Staff should dress so that they inspire confidence in parents.
    Since our parents were middle-class pushy Londoners, that meant very similar to what you are describing, Barrie, but I never had to spell it out. P.E. teachers and those dealing with 3 and 4 year-olds obviously dressed differently from a teacher of English in the Senior School, because a Hockey or Foundation Stage teacher in high heels and a suit would inspire less confidence.

     
  11. I think originally it was quite a simple dress code but people started taking liberties and they spelled it out.
    Its the same with the student uniform. They have even had to stipulate " ear rings, one pair of small studs for pierced ears . One in each ear. That was because a kid took the wee and decided she would have two in one ear punk style.
    I am not sure when the ladies dress code was so formalised but I think it was recently . At Christmas the HT sent a teacher home for wearing a top which was too low cut and a male reacher home for wearing trousers that were sporty and scruffy ( cargos or whatever they call them).
    I think the whole idea is to present an image to parents that inspires them with some confidence.
    I was not talking about the prep school, although male teachers in prep do wear suits. female teachers do tend to be a little less formal with trousers and skirts but with more informal tops and jumpers.
    When I was told the rules I cant say as it bothered me, its just other people who got me going on this.
     
  12. Barrie, the dress code at my school is pretty much the same as Theo is describing - and for the same sort of school. Our 6th form are pushing all boundaries at the moment though, but that's a different story!
     
  13. polly.glot

    polly.glot New commenter

    What's wrong with professional standards of dress? Most professions require a "look" which suits the nature of the job. My barrister sister is not permitted to wear trousers, short skirts, bright colours or "immodest" garments. Doctors in hospitals wear white coats, not so much to cover their clothes as to set them apart and give patients confidence, in that they are dressed according to people's notions of a medical professional.

     
  14. doctors aren't allowed to wear white coats in hospitals anymore because of MRSA - they all wear their own clothes and no long sleeves - don't you watch Holby City?
     
  15. With the sunshine today came the reminder of a need for a staff dress code in our school, in the form of a slender and attractive female NQT wearing low cut trousers revealing her hip bones and toned midrift.
    She looked perfectly lovely but is it fair on all those adolescent males, with hormones raging !
    Do you think those of us with the wobbly tums and wrinkles would get away with it ? Am I being ageist?
    I do think that dress codes ought to keep up with the times and younger staff ought not to feel the need to dress like their parents, but I do think hip bones and midrifts should be kept under cover whatever your age! I am just amazed that this has to be spelled out to people.



     
  16. I do think this thread is SO funny! I had a ramble on the main 'what do you wear?' thread, but agree with what everybody has been saying on here about indies..........
    We do have quite a prescriptive dress code, but there are still those who flout the rules, especially the lunch ladies! We have one lady who was showing off her bright red bra under her backless top today, but thankfully she had remembered to cover her eyebrow ring with a plaster[​IMG]
    I especially find myself on dodgy ground in the summer, of wanting to look my age (37) and not frumpy which I hope I manage at home, but looking smart enough for work?? Some of my older colleagues have got the look sorted, but as they're perhaps 15 yrs older the same things don't look right on me. Suggestions on a postcard
     
  17. Whilst I think that, as teachers, we should be setting an example to pupils in personal presentation, I would not want to be too prescriptive.

    Unless teachers, like UK pupils, should wear a uniform.
     
  18. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I refer you to post 9 . . .
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar at 2pm on Saturday February 25th, and also the Moving into Headship or SLT seminar on Saturday 17th March.
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
    www.tesweekendworkshop90.eventbrite.com

     
  19. Look smart. You can always change into something more relaxed when you get home.
    It can be a good idea to have 'school clothes' which present the professional side of your charachter & 'home clothes' or 'mufti' for off-duty activites.
    Just as an aside........ female science staff sometimes have to think twice before donning work clothes - especially if there is an activity that will require kneeling / sitting / crouching on the floor, standing on ladders / chairs / desks or bending over some apparatus. I only wish some of the pupils thought about this before they got dressed in the morning too!
     

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