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School Direct (Salaried) Unconditional Offer Withdrawn Unfairly?

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by aswat_suhail, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. aswat_suhail

    aswat_suhail New commenter

    I applied for a School Direct (Salaried) position with a SCITT. I had received a conditional offer (to pass the skills tests). After I had completed the skills tests the SCITT offered me an unconditional offer which I subsequently accepted. This happened in March.

    I had then been told in June that they will be withdrawing my position as they couldn't find a school to place me in.

    I had already handed in a letter of resignation for my old school at the start of the summer term as is the policy in the school i teach (N.B this was also after i had received the unconditional offer so i assumed there would be no issues).

    I have only been told that I should not look to see if there are any vacancies with any other training providers (highly unlikely as it is now June).

    They have told me they can offer me a non salaried position or pgce postion where i will have to pay £9k.

    Is this a "Breach of Contract" on behalf of the SCITT. Are they obliged to try their utmost best to find a placement and if not help as much as possible to find a placement with another provider.

    I really do not know what to do. I do not have a job at my current school as the position has been filled and now do not even have my "unconditional" offer.

    Has anyone else experienced this or could advise on the best thing to do and my legal rights.

    This has severely impacted a lot of things in my professional and personal life. I was in the process of looking to buy a house and so this will now affect any chance of a mortgage.
     
  2. dunnocks

    dunnocks Star commenter

    of course, I don't know, but this sort of situation often arises when ofsted puts a school in special measures. They are then no longer allowed to take trainees or NQTs, and any on their staff already, or about to take up a position, lose their place with no compensation.

    There doesn't seem to be anything that can be done about it, but at least you have a few weeks notice. I met an NQT at an interview yesterday who had gone into work as normal at the start of the week, the school got ofsteded, she was called into a meeting with other NQTs on Thursday, and told not to return on Friday.

    I personally can't understand how ofsted don't realise this level extra stress put onto NQTs during inspections is going to make them so stressed they are not going to be able to function normally. Even the SMT, who stand to lose their jobs after a failed ofsted, get weeks or months notice.

    Its so unfair. It has left you totally in the lurch.It is such bad luck on you, and you have done nothing wrong

    :(:(:(

    speak to your current school

    They might keep you, of course if they are like my school, they are trying to shed support staff jobs they might have lept onto your resignation with shouts of joy :(:(:(

    on the pus side, there are lots of vacancies at the moment, and you stand a good chance of finding something.

    or you could get a loan and do a PGCE

    or you could take this as a warning and give teaching a wide berth....

    best wishes. x
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  3. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter

    Union? Or maybe seek legal advice from a solicitor or CAB? But check the SCITT terms & conditions (small print) first...
     
  4. MrMedia

    MrMedia Star commenter

    If they can offer you a PGCE position then they can place you fine.

    What they can't find is a school to pay your salary. They get 9k back, but have to pay as much as 24k. This means a school was intending to do this, but since the budget cuts has decided it no longer wants to do this and has simply stiffed you. The SCITT has been unable to find another school prepared to take on the financial burden. If it was me, I would place a call to the NCTL who run allocations. Any consortium of schools engaged in such practice as yours might find their entire allocation affected. An enquiring call from the NCTL to the SCITT might just provoke a reaction.
     
    pepper5, sabrinakat, chelsea2 and 4 others like this.
  5. unfoggingblogger

    unfoggingblogger Occasional commenter

    Definitely get in touch with a union.
     
  6. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    [QUOTE="dunnocks, post: 12117664, member: 20026866"

    There doesn't seem to be anything that can be done about it, but at least you have a few weeks notice. I met an NQT at an interview yesterday who had gone into work as normal at the start of the week, the school got ofsteded, she was called into a meeting with other NQTs on Thursday, and told not to return on Friday.

    I personally can't understand how ofsted don't realise this level extra stress put onto NQTs during inspections is going to make them so stressed they are not going to be able to function normally. Even the SMT, who stand to lose their jobs after a failed ofsted, get weeks or months notice.

    x[/QUOTE]

    What?! This isn't legal, surely? You're saying the NQT was fired, at no notice, because the school had a poor ofsted? Even though they personally had not done anything wrong?! Members of the leadership team losing their jobs is different; this presumably happens when the leadership of the school is the issue so the poor ofsted IS their fault.

    I have heard about school's in SM not being allowed to take on NQTs, and trainees, but I don't think it extends to the instant firing of those already in post. In fact, I had a SD student once for a placement, who was mainly training in a school which had been put in SM but she was still allowed to complete her training there. They couldn't however, take her on as an NQT the following year which was the original plan.

    Sorry I've gone way of track from the OP. I don't have any legal advice I'm afraid :( what a rubbish situation
     
  7. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Take it with a very large pinch of salt.

    To the OP, yes they can do this. If there isn't a school who can take you, then there isn't much else they can do.
    However, you are free to ignore their request not to try to find a placement with someone else. Get on to other providers, explain the situation and see if they can help. If not, then it is just very, very bad luck on your part.
     
  8. Pomza

    Pomza Star commenter

    Appears to be rather a lot of confusion here.

    Firstly - When taking the salaried SD route, it is not possible for the training provider/university to make any form of 'unconditional' offer of paid employment. This is becauase salaried SD teachers are employed directly by individual schools/academies/trusts as non-qualified teachers and need to go through the normal recruitment essentials - Interview, references, DBS etc. A training provider could not make a job offer on behalf of a school.

    The training provider may have made an 'offer' to accept you on to the 'course' and may also have endevoured to find you a school to place you in, via existing relationships (conditional to you sucessfully completing the recruitment process). But in this instance, they may have been unable to find a school willing to take you. You could suggest that you attempt to to find your own placement school.

    I gainned QTS through the graduate training programme (A pre-cursor of SD) and the school I did my placement in had never had one before and had no existing relationship with a university. I managed to persuade the Head to employ me, then the university were happy to support. (And gain a relationship with another school...)

    Secondly - If a school is placed in SM after an Ofsted inspection, NQTs are not fired. This is complete BS.

    They may forbid the school from taking on any new NQTs. They may even contact the relevent local authority and recomend that any in situ NQTs complete their induction in other schools (This would be very rare). But no NQT would ever by sent home with no job to go to!!
     

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