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Scheme of Work Objectives in Music Lessons

Discussion in 'Music' started by emma_watson225, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Dear all TES-sers,
    We (as a department) have been advised by SMT to share the success criteria for a scheme of work at the beginning of every lesson as well as any further "steps to success" that may be required. Currently we only use the lesson objectives at the beginning of every lesson.
    Does anybody do this? What are your approaches?
    In addition, how do you use the National Curriculum levels e.g. how far do you personalise them? Does anybody use them "religiously"? If you have any examples, I would love to see them.
    Many thanks in advance :)
     
  2. Dear all TES-sers,
    We (as a department) have been advised by SMT to share the success criteria for a scheme of work at the beginning of every lesson as well as any further "steps to success" that may be required. Currently we only use the lesson objectives at the beginning of every lesson.
    Does anybody do this? What are your approaches?
    In addition, how do you use the National Curriculum levels e.g. how far do you personalise them? Does anybody use them "religiously"? If you have any examples, I would love to see them.
    Many thanks in advance :)
     
  3. Sometimes at the start of a unit and at the start of individual lessons I remind the students what the different outcomes will be - what a minimum outcome might be and how you might muild on that to achieve higher levels.
    For example - in the unit on the blues, students submit a performance which musc inlude the 12 bar blues chord sequence, a melody that I have have written based on the blues scale and some improvisation based on this scale either as short fills at the end of phrases or as a longer 12 bar instrumental. I also show them different ways of playing the blues riff - some of which are more blusey than others.
    I point to the national curriculum levels that are printed in their progress diaries (I have written them out in semi-student language) and point out that the higher levels are all about using the features of styles and genres - so the more "blues-like" their performances are the, the hgher the mark. We also listen to many recordings of blues both sung and played.
    So I guess that the answer to your questions is:
    1. It can never hurt for students to understand and see an example of different levels of outcome.(They do it in D+T and in Art and also in PE).
    2. The national curriculm levels inform my approach to what it means to make "porgress". I might not fully agree with this approach, however it is a framework that exists and I'm quite happy to work with it as making another one is quite a lot of work.
    If students don't know what they are working towards then it is unlikeliy they will get there.
    The trick is to stop the weaker students trying to walk before they can run - so I'm at pains to point out that; first you need to have this in place, when you can do that, try adding this, don't jump the stages - some students can jump ahead, other might need to only go so far.
    One final point - I now use a listening test as the primary source of assessing musical understanding and the test includes much on the backgorund and musical contexts of each genre as well as its nuts and bolts - opportunity to demonstrate those higher levesl of understanding again. At all points in the unit I am pointing out: "and this chord sequence will be in the test" or "and you need to show me you understant why this music is sad and slow".
    If students don't understand what they are learning, they are unlikely to learn it - or at least, to be able to make sense of the learning in an exam or test.
     

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