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Scatter graphs, y9 top set level 7 - 8

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by toffee20, May 5, 2012.

  1. toffee20

    toffee20 New commenter

    Hello,

    I'm a trainee teacher and I need to teach a lesson about scatter graphs to a very good y9 set. I've been struggling to find what level work is right for them - I've looked at the national strategy / mymaths but can't find anything for the level 8 - any ideas or tips where else to look to find the levels of work?
    Or any ideas about how to take scatter graphs work up to a level 8 would be very appreciated!

    Thank you :)
     
  2. toffee20

    toffee20 New commenter

    Hello,

    I'm a trainee teacher and I need to teach a lesson about scatter graphs to a very good y9 set. I've been struggling to find what level work is right for them - I've looked at the national strategy / mymaths but can't find anything for the level 8 - any ideas or tips where else to look to find the levels of work?
    Or any ideas about how to take scatter graphs work up to a level 8 would be very appreciated!

    Thank you :)
     
  3. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Established commenter

    Finding the equation of the line of best fit would seem an obvious extension.
     
  4. pencho

    pencho New commenter

    Little beyong L6 scatter diagrams they are likely need to know, if you are a good group and you want to extend their knowledge, you might look at things like
    - Non linear correlation
    - Spearnman's Rank
    - PMCC
    - Regression Lines

     
  5. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    If you've really got the time, you could do that - but make crystal clear you're doing it as extra help for their science GCSEs.
    The need to know never to fit to a curve in maths.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Give a few points at either end.
    Discuss issues with the results - not enough data to plot points, how many points do you need so you have a line of best fit?
    How accurate is a point? Introduce margins of error (this comes from extensive work as a scientist when we had to do 100 experiments just to get 1 data point accurate to +/ - 1% accuracy)
    How would that look on a scatter graph?
    Life is rarely a neat correlation.
    We used to have a data point with a little line going up and down showing the possible range of that value. How would this affect the results?
     
  7. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    I just re-read the OP and only just noticed you're a trainee.

    If you do choose to teach something that's for the benefit of the scientists, make sure your lesson plan brings this out and you've highlighted it as cross-curricular. Make sure you go see the science department and find out exactly what they teach so you're completely in line with them. If you do that and document it, it will be good evidence for your standards.

    And if you don't do that, how will you answer when your observer asks you what objective the fitting to a curve activity was aimed at and would you mind pointing to it on the scheme of work, please?
     
  8. toffee20

    toffee20 New commenter

    Thank you for all of this - really helpful :)
     

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