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Saudi Arabia....

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by Jason_Bourne_, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. Jason_Bourne_

    Jason_Bourne_ Occasional commenter

    I've got a question for you kind folks...

    when a person moves to Saudi Arabia, he is unable to take his family with him until he obtains his residence permit. Once he has obtained his residence permit, he is then able to sponsor his family to join him.

    Is anyone aware of (i) how long it takes to obtain a residence permit in Saudi Arabia and (ii) how long it then takes to sponsor their family?

    If possible, please stick to this topic rather than discussing why one shouldn't move to Saudi Arabia...
     
  2. doctorinthetardis

    doctorinthetardis New commenter

    I arrived in Saudi maybe 3 weeks ago and got my residency permit a few days ago. I think it does depend on which organisation/ school you are working for. I'm not sure about how long it takes to sponsor a family I'm afraid. I do know that Eid is coming up so all government work stops for several weeks due to this so cultural holidays/ celebrations do have an effect depending on when you arrive! PM me if you have any more questions about Saudi and I can try to answer them, although I haven't been here long :)
     
  3. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    How about why someone SHOULD move to Saudi, Jason_Bourne? In the Magic Kingdom, there are some excellent schools (I will not discuss the horrible ones) and Mrs Hippopotamus thoroughly enjoyed working at her school, all those years ago when we were in Jeddah. Teachers in KSA get some excellent benefits: a very good salary, very nice accommodation, good medical cover and some great travel opportunities. Everywhere in the ME is just round the corner from Saudi. The snorkelling and the diving in Jeddah were excellent. Plus the expats in the kingdom are usually a friendly bunch, with a lot of camaraderie. Yes, the kingdom is "dry", but that is not a problem if you are no big drinker. Okay, KSA is filthy hot in the summer months, but you won't be there for the hottest part of the year and there is AC everywhere. And don't forget the great Turkish restaurant near the bicycle roundabout in Jeddah,
     
    sara2323 likes this.
  4. Jason_Bourne_

    Jason_Bourne_ Occasional commenter

    Thanks. Pm sent.
     
  5. Jason_Bourne_

    Jason_Bourne_ Occasional commenter

    You have mentioned a lot of good reasons, however, there are many people in this forum who look for any excuse to criticise Saudi Arabia because it doesn't suit their lifestyle or they show a lack of understanding of a country that they haven't visited... each to their own!
     
    sara2323 likes this.
  6. rod901

    rod901 New commenter

    Just meet up in Bahrain until you get your residency. There is a big rush to Bahhhhrain every wednesday afternoon. Nice restaurants in bahhhrain. I recommend Fusions at the top of the Gulf hotel
     
  7. makhnovite

    makhnovite Occasional commenter

    Teachers? You just gotta luv 'em!
     
  8. oldgit

    oldgit New commenter

    Except that, until you get your residency, you can't get an exit/re-entry visa.
     
  9. rod901

    rod901 New commenter

    Get a mulriple entry work visit visa then and convert it into an Iqana
     
  10. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    Enjoy. I've never lived there but have known several who loved it and stayed for yonks.
     
  11. oldgit

    oldgit New commenter

    You don't teach music, do you? Seriously, though, no teacher working at a decent school should be asked to sort out their own iqama.
     
    blueskydreaming and dumbbells66 like this.
  12. dumbbells66

    dumbbells66 Established commenter

    reincarnation number 23 now i think :p
     
  13. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    My Iqama took about 5 weeks and then my wife came over about 2 weeks after that.

    Where is KSA will you be working?
     
  14. yorkie63

    yorkie63 New commenter



    You can in Kuwait
     
  15. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    But the OP is asking about Saudi Arabia
     
  16. Jason_Bourne_

    Jason_Bourne_ Occasional commenter

    Haven't got a job yet but would be looking at schools in Jeddah, Riyadh and Damman.
     
  17. stopwatch

    stopwatch Occasional commenter

    Choose your schools carefully - there are few to choose from which are worth moving halfway across the world for.
     
  18. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    As usual, stoppers makes a good point. Yes, there some horrendous and outrageously horrible schools in the Magic Kingdom. I know because I taught at one of them. Avoid the human-and-rodent institutions at all costs, while the places where the fat is chewed are also pretty dire. (Let's hope that is suitably cryptic to avoid deletion by the TES Mods.)
     
  19. sazad99

    sazad99 New commenter

    May I ask why you've chosen these locations as apposed to other more flamboyant areas of the middle east like UAE and Qatar
     
  20. VS400

    VS400 New commenter

    Husband moved first to Saudi. Had business visa for three months so had to do border runs to Bahrain (this was company policy to do this during probation before converting to residency permit and he was given cash, phone and housing so didn't need residency for those months.) Once residency was granted (a few weeks) and he obtained iqama he then applied for my residency which I got within a few weeks. After this he applied for my multiple entry exit which also took a week or so. So for us about 6 months in all, including his probation. Depends on the PRO at your company but I'm a local hire teacher so everything was done through my husband's work. The best schools here (I.e the real British and American ones which there really only is one of each per city) are used to doing all this every year so seem fairly on the ball.
     

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