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Saturday lessons

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by highland park, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    I'm in a big inner-city comprehensive that over the past two years has developed an extensive programme of Saturday and holiday lessons for pupils run by teachers. At first it was just before big exams, but now that GCSEs are more modular it seems to be all of the time--nearly every weekend since January, and every half-term and Easter break. Staff are paid to attend these sessions but pressure is put on staff when they don't want to attend, and the sessions are compulsory for students. On top of a backbreaking weekly work schedule, it's a lot! Has anyone else had to deal with this? I'm trying to figure out if this is the way all schools are going or if it's just mine. We're told that this is 'normal' but I'm not sure.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi,
    I'm in a big inner-city comprehensive that over the past two years has developed an extensive programme of Saturday and holiday lessons for pupils run by teachers. At first it was just before big exams, but now that GCSEs are more modular it seems to be all of the time--nearly every weekend since January, and every half-term and Easter break. Staff are paid to attend these sessions but pressure is put on staff when they don't want to attend, and the sessions are compulsory for students. On top of a backbreaking weekly work schedule, it's a lot! Has anyone else had to deal with this? I'm trying to figure out if this is the way all schools are going or if it's just mine. We're told that this is 'normal' but I'm not sure.
    Thanks!
     
  3. Compassman

    Compassman Star commenter

    They are not compulsory for students either whatever the school says and no you shouldn't have to go if you don't want to.
     
  4. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Not normal where I work. We tried Easter break lessons . The staff were paid but the kids voted with their feet and didn't turn up. So that idea was dropped.

    I do occassionally do saturday sessions for external candidates but they pay me.
     
  5. It seems it won't before long before schools slip this one in contractually (probably already is in some academies). All the keenies (young ones with big mortgages) say 'yes' so, if you don't, you're defined as not committed. A former colleague of mine was actually told that! It's yet another thing that should not be asked, so you aren't made to feel bad for saying no.
     

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