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SATS targets

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by Twigs85, May 3, 2012.

  1. Twigs85

    Twigs85 New commenter

    Hi there,

    I'm a Year 2 teacher about to experience SATs for the first time. I have a concern about progress in my class. Every child will meet the expected 2 sub levels progress by the end of the year, however there is a HUGE focus on pushing more able children this year which means that I am having to push most of my class through 3 or 4 sublevels (e.g 1a to a 3c or 2a, even WA to a 2c). The majority of my targets are sitting above the national average of 2b, even though hardly anyone came up as higher than a 1a this year. For an NQT, I feel that this is a big task. I've been looking at my attainment profiles and have just realised that there's a child who needs to go up two sublevels to hit his SATs target i.e. in two weeks! It's not possible. It's been made clear that these targets have to be met and I'm just worried about what will happen if I do what feels right and level them where they actually ARE and not where they are wanted to be. I also don't want to pass the buck to the year 3 teacher by levelling them too high just to meet targets, resulting in a plateau or even in Year 3.

    What I'd like to know is - is this normal? Has anyone ever got in trouble for levelling the children and not achieving crazy targets?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Twigs85

    Twigs85 New commenter

    Hi there,

    I'm a Year 2 teacher about to experience SATs for the first time. I have a concern about progress in my class. Every child will meet the expected 2 sub levels progress by the end of the year, however there is a HUGE focus on pushing more able children this year which means that I am having to push most of my class through 3 or 4 sublevels (e.g 1a to a 3c or 2a, even WA to a 2c). The majority of my targets are sitting above the national average of 2b, even though hardly anyone came up as higher than a 1a this year. For an NQT, I feel that this is a big task. I've been looking at my attainment profiles and have just realised that there's a child who needs to go up two sublevels to hit his SATs target i.e. in two weeks! It's not possible. It's been made clear that these targets have to be met and I'm just worried about what will happen if I do what feels right and level them where they actually ARE and not where they are wanted to be. I also don't want to pass the buck to the year 3 teacher by levelling them too high just to meet targets, resulting in a plateau or even in Year 3.

    What I'd like to know is - is this normal? Has anyone ever got in trouble for levelling the children and not achieving crazy targets?

    Thanks!
     
  3. HJenx74

    HJenx74 New commenter

    Hi, I'm a Year 6 teacher in my third NQT term and I feel your pain! Expected to make silk purses out of sow's ears too. I've been expected to get some children from 2A to 4B in the space of a school year. Simply not possible. The school are supportive, and I don't feel that I will be held personally responsible if they don't all come out with level 4s, 5s (or 6s!), just warned that poor results might trigger an Ofsted inspection...great! Good luck to you and yours for the next few weeks!
     
  4. Twigs85

    Twigs85 New commenter

    2A to 4B is insane! Sometimes the children just aren't going to get there and it's not the teachers fault! What's really getting me is that it's not in the best interests of the children - there's a difference between helping them fulfil their potential and pushing them to fill a box. All I teach is maths and literacy, there's no room for anything else that's fun. Some kids lunchtimes are being cut into 30 mins so they can attend daily writing booster (with me, meaning I have worked a 14 hour day with 15 minutes lunch and am still going for the next hour or so!). These children are SIX YEARS OLD. Good luck with everything, I'm just looking forward to next half term when we can do fun things!
     
  5. HJenx74

    HJenx74 New commenter

    My son is in Y2 (at my school) and I would be horrified if he had to give up his lunchtime for a booster group. I'm all for booster sessions in assembly times, but not in the children's (and teacher's) rest times. It really is awful, isn't it? Yes, next half term is what's keeping me going! Will then have to worry about the results coming in!
     
  6. As a year 6 teacher I too feel your pain guys. Firstly remember this, it is not just down to the Year 2 or Year 6 teacher to make all that progress. Our school is now starting to look at this.
    My biggest problem is the children who are falling short of the expected level 4 (or in come cases L5) are the ones who came up with ridiculously high inflated KS1 results. Having worked in year 3, I know this can be a problem - child allegedly with a Level 3 in maths but who cannot do basic number bonds or addition. Children with a level 3 in literacy but this is not the same as a level 3 in Upper Ks2.
    I have three children who have moved to us during KS2 from other schools - one came to us in Year 6 and we assessed pretty quickly at a 3c in maths - allegedly her primary school has her at a a 2a for KS1. This means in the 3 years she has been in their KS2 she has mande one sub-level! I suspect the 2a at Year 2 was wrong. Fortunately with some 1-1 this girl has made fantastic progress as her home and personal circumctances have now also setteled down.
    Let's face it L4 is average for a Year 6 child - surely there will always be children above and belowe this, but it seems they are now pushing L5 as the new average. We have had bigger targets on the number of L5s we need to produce because the number of L3 our Year 2 teachers sent up!
    The trouble is if Yr2 over inflate to keep the wolf from the door, this then sets up a massive headache that you just can't claw back from by Year 6.
    In the school I was in last year as an NQT it was even worse as I also had to explain why some children appeared to have slipped back by my assessments and when I gave them tests - perhaps because other teachers have over inflated because of perfromance management targets? The fact this school now is on special measures speaks volumes, but perhaps we all know teachers who are doing this in schools where the moderation is not robust enough :-(
     
  7. HJenx74

    HJenx74 New commenter

    You are absolutely right, level 5 is the new level 4 - we're pushing children to level 6 now.
    I do agree that some Y2 teachers inflate the results of their children, but I honestly believe that those 4 years can herald massive changes in a child's attitude to work and school. I think some children can be legitimately level 2a/3 at KS1 SATs but by the time they reach KS2 SATs they have become disinterested, their outside interests take priorityand their parents are less involved in their education. It is easy to see how progress in KS1 is not mirrored in KS2 (not always the fault of the teaching).
    Good luck to all Y2 and Y6 teachers for the next few weeks.
     

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