1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

SATS booster classes - diabolical liberty

Discussion in 'Primary' started by minnieminx, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. bonnie1

    bonnie1 Senior commenter

    I must admit, i have mixed feelings about this. Is this service to the children in the holiday free to the parents?
    Will teaching booster classes become the norm with an expectation that teachers work in the holdiay, without any extra payment? A lot of people would like to see teacher's holidays eroded.
     
  2. manc

    manc New commenter

    I don't doubt that you think the scheme was fun, and memorable for the children. What about the free will of the children. Their parents wanted them to go? Why, I wonder? I think a combination of panic, competitiveness and child-care.
    The fact of its being enjoyable does not change the PRINCIPLE of it one jot.
    It's the establishment of the cramming for exams which I object to - whatever distracting alternative activites are built around it.
     
  3. manc

    manc New commenter

    That's the aim...Thank you for the vote of confidence. :)
    How did I guess??
     
  4. manc

    manc New commenter

    I must admit, i have mixed feelings about this. Is this service to the children in the holiday free to the parents? Will teaching booster classes become the norm with an expectation that teachers work in the holdiay, without any extra payment? A lot of people would like to see teacher's holidays eroded.
    Precisely. And we know who'll we'll have to thank when it happens. Teachers will <u>never</u> improve their employment conditions because the Stepford wives continue to hold such sway in the primary sector.
     
  5. zugthebug

    zugthebug New commenter

    been away for a couple of days so just to put the record straight -
    NO the currciculum isn't narrowed before NCTests (Markuss), in fact I really object to the idea that the moderation for writing will use writing in other curriculum areas. If I am teaching history then i am teaching the skills of being an historian, researching, comparing sources, examining similarities, looking for causes and consequences. Any writing tends to be the result of collaborative work, either paired or groups and therefore couldn't be attributed to a single child. If I am teaching science i would rather they got stuck in with the practical work rather than writing about it (usually i expect results recorded and every couple of sessions an investigation planned and carried out - again in groups). We also took part in STEM week in March.
    Y6 play in as many competitive sports as we can - we are a rural school reliant on parent transport whcih isn't always forthcoming. for those who aren't into competitive sports we have had parcour, dance, circus skills to name a few
    There is a big production at the end of the summer and Y6 lead both Christmas and Easter services at the church.
    I am fighting against complacency in an 11+ area, the brightest know they are going to grammar school and the parents aren't bothered by SATs. What we will get are the Y5 parents starting to want extra coaching and work for their child's 11+ tests which are early sept.
     
  6. manc

    manc New commenter

    And is it right for schools to succumb to this pressure?
     
  7. zugthebug

    zugthebug New commenter

    would take a brave head not to. My HT is fantastic but when LA threatens, OfSTED looms and a HT can lose their job they would be mad not to succumb
     
  8. manc

    manc New commenter

    True - and to quote the wise words of St Basil of Fawlty: 'that's how Nazi Germany started'
     
  9. My Yr 6 Grandaughter was "invited" to Maths Booster classes one hour a week after school for the first half of last term. I was delighted and most grateful to the school for offering this. All her school life (although bright) she has been saying "I hate Maths. I'm no good at Maths. I don't want a job where I have to be good at Maths. By half term she was explaining to me the difference between "Mean' & "range" by means of a "Hey Diddle Diddle Rhyme" and saying I'm quite good at Matyhs now. I thanked the school and congratulated them on the change in her at half term. Whether as a result of this or something else I do not know but the booster classes were continued untll Easter. She is now a confident mathematician - a good level 4. I cannot thank the school & the Maths teacher enough. I should add the school is in a very disadvantaged area - much gun & knife crime as well as drugs plus a large number of non English speaking immigrants who come & go. The children themselves have been told that the school could be top of the league if they did not take in all the non English speaking applicants "but that would not be kind" The booster classes are therefore purely run out of altruism for the pupils to get as much out of school and give them confidence before moving on to secondary school Thank you all those teachers reading this who do the same - often with no thanks
     
  10. manc

    manc New commenter

    Nothing wrong with that. This thread is really about teachers being coerced into giving up holiday-time to do the same thing.
     
  11. NQT88

    NQT88 New commenter

    Thought I'd throw my two cents in.

    I did Easter school for the first week and for free. I wasn't coerced and I was more than happy to do it.

    About half the class came and the children loved it. I had 3 come up to me to thank me because they'd either 'never liked writing before but now really loved it' or 'felt really confident' etc. and it shows in their work now. They are confident about what they're doing. They're leading group sessions and putting their hand up and more importantly they're happy and confident!

    We invited 14 children and 12 turned up and it was the CHILDREN who were invited, they had to agree and one of the ones that didn't turn up was ill.

    I'd definately do it again next year.
     
  12. I do term time tuition after school and have also led sessions in the holidays for children of all abilities. I don't really understand why some teachers find this so offensive. Children attend if they want to. It has been mentioned that this is only because of pressure from parents and/or the school - I completely disagree. Children in my class actually approach me about tuition both in and out of term time. The school I teach in is in challenging circumstances, however we are graded as good. One of the reasons for this is that children take ownership of their learning. Children in my class talk about getting a good job in the future and going to university (for most, they would be the first in their family to do so).
    Why is it so terrible to offer children the chance to succeed and better their future?
     
  13. Hettys

    Hettys New commenter

    But what are you teaching/achieving in these sessions that you can't/don't teach/achieve during term time lessons?.
     
  14. manc

    manc New commenter

    Children in my class actually approach me about tuition both in and out of term time. The school I teach in is in challenging circumstances, however we are graded as good. One of the reasons for this is that children take ownership of their learning. Children in my class talk about getting a good job in the future and going to university (for most, they would be the first in their family to do so). Why is it so terrible to offer children the chance to succeed and better their future?
    Is this for real? Children requesting tuition in the holidays? Why? Are they the Midwich Cuckoos?
    'Ownership of their learning??' What??? Ownership? What does that actually mean?
    'Excuse me, miss. I don't want to go out and play in my holidays. I want extra tuition please to enable me (a) to take ownership of my own learning and (b) to enable me to rise up out of challenging circumstances and be ultimately a university-educated trail-blazer for my family."
    Yes... the more I think about it, the more realistic it sounds....


     
  15. pachamama

    pachamama New commenter

    I left J4 in 1989. I remember SMP maths. Each child worked from a different box at their level. However, we also got to mark our own work using the answer cards. Nothing like a bit of self-assessment!
     
  16. manc

    manc New commenter

    Oh, erm.. thanks for that, pachamama.
     

Share This Page