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safeguarding

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Fran63, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. In order to keep the children safe in school, we have recently introduced a system where parents/ carers can no longer wander into the school building. Parents who have business in school are asked to sign in, and others are asked to leave their children at the door. This has caused great upset and frustration for parents. I have explained that it is for the safety of the pupils, but the decision has been met with comments such as " This used to be such a welcoming school, and now we are being locked out".
    i am interested to see what other schools do in this regard, and also need signposting to statuatory advice or guidelines that I can use to support this new system.
     
  2. In order to keep the children safe in school, we have recently introduced a system where parents/ carers can no longer wander into the school building. Parents who have business in school are asked to sign in, and others are asked to leave their children at the door. This has caused great upset and frustration for parents. I have explained that it is for the safety of the pupils, but the decision has been met with comments such as " This used to be such a welcoming school, and now we are being locked out".
    i am interested to see what other schools do in this regard, and also need signposting to statuatory advice or guidelines that I can use to support this new system.
     
  3. Our parents are not allowed in school!
    They pick up children from the playground and if they go into the front office, they have to go straight to the office and explain why they are there. - id be more worried if you let them wander in and out - madness! Anybody could come in!
    We have signs clearly stating this too. Something like 'All visitors must sign in at the school office' or something to that effect'.
     
  4. Just point out that in the event of a fire, the fire brigade would not be aware of any parents floating around the school without signing in at reception.
     
  5. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    Our doors are open from 8.45 and parents are welcome (in fact in FS encouraged) to come into school. First bell rings at 8.55 which is a sort of 5 minute warning, 2nd bell at 9.00 and we do register, all external doors are locked at this point and parents are expected to have left.
    At the end of the day parents either collect children from classroom door or from lines on the playground. If a child has lost a jumper etc then parents are allowed into school to help look.
    However my children's school is the exact opposite and they line up on the playground and are collected by their teachers. Parents have to stand well back and are not supposed to approach either the lines or any of the staff. The opposite happens at home time. If there is anything you want to mention to their teachers you have to either send a note in or go round and leave a message at the office.
    I have to say as both a teacher and a parent I prefer how things happen at the school I teach in as it allows for much more communcation and openess with parents.

     
  6. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    At my children's school we have to sign in for anything we've been invited into school for - this normally involves 100 plus parents queuing at the office and taking up to 15 minutes to get into school. In fact last time by the time I reached my sons classroom I'd missed the activity we'd been invited in to see! However we are not asked to sign out and people seem to leave at different times so the fire brigade still wouldn't be aware of how many parents were in school!
     
  7. We introduced this system last year after years of parents being allowed in. We had exactly the same reaction as you have - parents bemoaning the loss of the 'welcoming' school they had known.
    We introduced the system for safeguiarding reasons - i.e. we are a large school and I wouldn't know a year 1 parent from a potential Thomas Hamilton type etc. Visitors are supposed to sign in and wear a visitor's badge.
    Another reason was the delay having parents in classrooms in the morning used to cause for teachers. Many in the infants and Reception couldn't 'get rid' of parents, who would be queuing up long after the bell had gone!
    We think the new system makes for a calmer start to the day (for us and the children).
     
  8. frustum

    frustum Lead commenter

    My daughter's school can only be accessed by signing in at reception between 9.00 and 2.55 (although they don't bother with signing in for things like performances). Reception parents take into/collect from the classroom, but from March they start lining up like the older ones in the morning. One thing that I think is helpful is that many of the teachers are out on the playground for a few minutes before they take the line in, so there is ample opportunity to catch them and have a word.
     
  9. Ofsted would have a big problem with parents accessing school once the school hours are started. I know of a school that had to offer serious explanations to a parent wandering into a classroom to give their child a jumper. I have also heard examples of where they have also had taken issue with the fencing surrounding school grounds...
    We also had an 'open door' system until a few years ago. Teachers collect their children from the playground in the morning and children make their own way out in the afternoon (different in EYFS). A teacher stands by the door in both instances, ensuring adults do not enter. If they wish to, they sign in at the office.
    Parents understand this. The message was clear: To every other child but your own, you are a stranger. They respect this.
    Agree with that.
     

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