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Rude and arrogant Y9 girl

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by uvgoddess, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. Since Christmas I've been teaching a Y9 set 2 class that I took over in less than ideal circumstances. The kids weren't prepared for the move - they were only told on the first morning back, and or my class this meant that I was faced with kids who fifteen minutes before had no idea that they were going to change groups or teachers. I also have a few students who have been moved from set 1, and they're really not happy about it.
    I've worked out that part of the problem is that I'm trying to make them (shock horror!) think - I nearly had open mutiny the week before last because I expected them to draw on their own experience and come up with their own ideas! From what I've seen in their books from last term, they did a lot of copying and gap-fill - I thought at first glance they had done some language analysis (I teach English) but on reading their essays I found that they were all exactly the same. Anyway, I'm dealing with this in my planning now, but that aside, I'm having a particular prblem with three girls who seem to think they can talk over me, answer back and make offensive personal comments - and who then meet my sanctions with righteous indignation that
    causes great hilarity amongst the rest of the students.

    But one girl has emerged even from this as beyond rude. On Friday, after giving one warning for chatting I sent this girl out because she continued regardless. Unfortunately, the only teacher who could take her was the teacher who had the class last term, but I tried to make the best of it by thinking that he could lay on the 'I'm very disappointed in you' and make her feel some sort of guilt. Anyway, after sending out the other two girls who were pushing the boundaries -again
    for chatting - the rest of the class settled and we had a pretty good lesson - certainly the best I've had with them so far. But about five minutes from the end of the lesson the first girl came back in, stating loudly how great it was in Mr X's classroom, how well she'd worked, how he had a right laugh with his class, etc. I called her over and explained that I was going to issue a detention to make up for the lost lesson and contact her parents. Her response was first to accuse me of picking on her, then to make silly personal comments about me before turning to the rest of the class and shouting "Put your hand up if you don't want to be in here with her!" No one responded at first so she shouted it again and a few students cheered and put their hands up, and she laughed and walked off.
    I managed to tell her Head of House at the start of the next lesson and ring her mum after school (she promised me an apology on Monday), but as I'm not 100% confident that the matter will be dealt with as effectively as I'd like (things tend to be forgotten or pushed aside by fresh crises) I'd appreciate some ideas as to what action to take myself. I would like to get this girl out for a few lessons to give me the space to build relationships with the rest of the class, as I started to do in this case, but this is something that (at first) would just make her happy. I'd definitely do it if I knew that whoever I sent her to would make it a miserable experience, and if I knew she'd come back to find a settled and more contented class, but neither of these are guaranteed. I need something really that will make her realise that being in my class and shutting the hell up may not be her ideal choice but it's the best of a bad bunch.
     
  2. Since Christmas I've been teaching a Y9 set 2 class that I took over in less than ideal circumstances. The kids weren't prepared for the move - they were only told on the first morning back, and or my class this meant that I was faced with kids who fifteen minutes before had no idea that they were going to change groups or teachers. I also have a few students who have been moved from set 1, and they're really not happy about it.
    I've worked out that part of the problem is that I'm trying to make them (shock horror!) think - I nearly had open mutiny the week before last because I expected them to draw on their own experience and come up with their own ideas! From what I've seen in their books from last term, they did a lot of copying and gap-fill - I thought at first glance they had done some language analysis (I teach English) but on reading their essays I found that they were all exactly the same. Anyway, I'm dealing with this in my planning now, but that aside, I'm having a particular prblem with three girls who seem to think they can talk over me, answer back and make offensive personal comments - and who then meet my sanctions with righteous indignation that
    causes great hilarity amongst the rest of the students.

    But one girl has emerged even from this as beyond rude. On Friday, after giving one warning for chatting I sent this girl out because she continued regardless. Unfortunately, the only teacher who could take her was the teacher who had the class last term, but I tried to make the best of it by thinking that he could lay on the 'I'm very disappointed in you' and make her feel some sort of guilt. Anyway, after sending out the other two girls who were pushing the boundaries -again
    for chatting - the rest of the class settled and we had a pretty good lesson - certainly the best I've had with them so far. But about five minutes from the end of the lesson the first girl came back in, stating loudly how great it was in Mr X's classroom, how well she'd worked, how he had a right laugh with his class, etc. I called her over and explained that I was going to issue a detention to make up for the lost lesson and contact her parents. Her response was first to accuse me of picking on her, then to make silly personal comments about me before turning to the rest of the class and shouting "Put your hand up if you don't want to be in here with her!" No one responded at first so she shouted it again and a few students cheered and put their hands up, and she laughed and walked off.
    I managed to tell her Head of House at the start of the next lesson and ring her mum after school (she promised me an apology on Monday), but as I'm not 100% confident that the matter will be dealt with as effectively as I'd like (things tend to be forgotten or pushed aside by fresh crises) I'd appreciate some ideas as to what action to take myself. I would like to get this girl out for a few lessons to give me the space to build relationships with the rest of the class, as I started to do in this case, but this is something that (at first) would just make her happy. I'd definitely do it if I knew that whoever I sent her to would make it a miserable experience, and if I knew she'd come back to find a settled and more contented class, but neither of these are guaranteed. I need something really that will make her realise that being in my class and shutting the hell up may not be her ideal choice but it's the best of a bad bunch.
     
  3. ' I would like to get this girl out for a few lessons to give me the space to build relationships with the rest of the class, as I started to do in this case, but this is something that (at first) would just make her happy. I'd definitely do it if I knew that whoever I sent her to would make it a miserable experience,'
    I agree she needs to be removed for a couple of lessons and it sounds like you have support and good behaviour systems in place but as we all know you cannot guaruntee that she is miserable elsewhere. What you can do is make the lesson so engaging and innovative without her negative influence. so when she tries to be 'clever' her friends will say what an amazing lesson they had with you. And potentially when she returns and tries to be disruptive the rest of the class will 'deal' with her. Year 9 girls are very self absorbed with their image and social networks perhaps if you could relate a lesson to that or include a film clip from something they all watch, but only do a taster and leave them hanging for more....which you would deliver at the end of term when they have all completed the work to the standard you require. As for offensive comments, make an obvious gesture of writing them down and inform them you are keeping evidence to present to the Head of House and their parents. Good luck and keep focused on the students that want to learn.

     
  4. She's yr9. Sending her out whenever it's justified is the way to go.
    Her biggest driving force is social acceptance, preferably leadership. Even if she has icecreams and cartwheels outside the classroom, she has lost contact with the group of people she wants to impress, lead, excite, take notice of her. She might claim that anywhere and everywhere else is a better place to be, but she actually wants to be with her group.
     
  5. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    <ol>[*] Make sure she is aware of your boundaries and what sanctions you will use when she crosses the boundaries.[*]Remove her from her audience sooner rather than later in lessons where she plays up[*]Find as many ways as possible to make her life difficult until she behaves.[*]Enlist her form tutor. The support of form tutors is invaluable if they are any good[*]If there is a report system then stick her on subject report[*]What support is your head of department offering?</ol>
     
  6. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    This girl doesn't need understanding, or engaging; she should be dealt with using the school policy on sanctions, which in this case is fortunately a) what she deserves and b) what will restore order in your room the quickest.
    If any student dares to speak to a teacher as roughly as that, they should be out for at least a day, and then the parents should be called in before reintegration happens in the classroom. Seriously, coming down on her like a ton of bricks is the way forward here: the whole class will take their behaviour cues from her, because she's obviously a strong personality and a bit of a bully. Just because she (like many children) resent change and don't have the maturity to deal with instability doesn't mean that she should be allowed to get away with this kind of thuggishness for one second.
    Get her out of the lesson EVERY time she mucks about, but make sure you apply clear boundaries and sanctions as you do so: you don't want to be unfair, otherwise they'll just think that you're being mean, and their self-righteous ire will be stoked. And get tough with your head of house/ head of year- really demand that this girl is given some kind of alternative provision before she can come back in. If you suspect these kind of things often get forgotten, then it's your job to make sure you keep reminding the right people!
    Once this gang leader gets reminded that she's about 14 years old, and you're a grown up and a teacher, then the rest of the class will fall into line more quickly. But until you deal with her, you'll be fighting the same battle every day, for as long as she feels like it. Get tough.
    And good luck
    http://behaviourguru.blogspot.com/
     
  7. 'I agree she needs to be removed for a couple of lessons ...'
    'If any student dares to speak to a teacher as roughly as that, they should be out for at least a day...'
    In my book, she should be out FOREVER..... a doctor or a lawyer, or a clerk in a public office, could refuse to have to deal with an abusive client. Why aren't those signs you see in practically every office, hospital, shop nowadays: 'Abusive behaviour to staff will not be tolerated'---- pinned up in every classroom and corridor of every school in the country?
     
  8. Because that would mean our esteemed superiors in the educational heirachy would have to do something about it.
     

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