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RSVP Etiquette

Discussion in 'Personal' started by dolceandgabbana, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. About a week ago we were invited to a Christening and before I had a chance to buy an acceptance card and send it off, the mother asked if I had received the invitation and whether or not we would be coming. I was surprised at how forthcoming she was but said yes, that we would be going. But the question is, should I now send the acceptance card as a formal RSVP? I'm happy to send the card now that I've bought it, just wondering what etiquette dictates - I want to get it right!!
     
  2. About a week ago we were invited to a Christening and before I had a chance to buy an acceptance card and send it off, the mother asked if I had received the invitation and whether or not we would be coming. I was surprised at how forthcoming she was but said yes, that we would be going. But the question is, should I now send the acceptance card as a formal RSVP? I'm happy to send the card now that I've bought it, just wondering what etiquette dictates - I want to get it right!!
     
  3. I would still RSVP

    Whilst she has asked you in person, there was also a written invitation

    In my world that still requires a written response
     
  4. I hate it when people don't bother to RSVP then still bloody turn up.
    I haven't bloody catered for you but manners dictate I now have to make you welcome and feed you.
    This is a particular pain for children's parties.

     
  5. Dipsue, I would never just turn up - that is exceptionally ill-mannered. I thought it was quite uncouth for her to ask if I was going so soon after sending the invitation - I didn't get a chance to pop to the shops and get an RSVP in the post!
    Thanks Resourcefinder, that's what I was thinking. I'll send her the RSVP card and do it 'properly'.
     
  6. hazcard

    hazcard New commenter

    Etiquette seems to move a lot these days.
    I would have rung to say I was attending and then sent a written reply to confirm, as this means it is easier (for them) to cater for people?
     
  7. An RSVP is a formal request so you should respond formally and send your Acceptance card off.
     
  8. Uncouth? That's a bit much. She bumped into you and just asked - what's your problem with that?
     
  9. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    I was brought up to believe that a reply to ANYTHING should be in the same form in which the original invitation was sent - a written invitation with a written reply, a telephone invite with a telephone confirmation etc (and as soon as possible).
     
  10. catfordbetty

    catfordbetty New commenter

    Do remember it's proper to reply in the third person, so you need to write something like this:
    Mr/Mrs/Ms (your forename) Dolceandgabanna thanks (insert friend's name) for her kind invitation to the Christening of (child's name) at (name of church) on (date) and has much pleasure in accepting/regrets she is unable to attend.
    This maintains the pretence that you have a servant to do your correspondence. Also, you should reply on headed notepaper. The card you have purchased sounds vulgar and must be destroyed.
    Incidentally, it was very unbecoming of your friend to put you on the spot in the way she did. I advise that you break off the association as soon as is decently possible.

     
  11. Genuinely laughing out loud!
    Do you also post as sea-pink...?
     
  12. catfordbetty

    catfordbetty New commenter

    I'll let him answer that one!
     
  13. [​IMG]
    As I suspected!
     
  14. heh heh
     

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