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RS Least popular humanity?

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by ramaduds, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. ramaduds

    ramaduds New commenter

    I'd be the first to defend RE as a popular subject, but recently came across these statistics and shows I have an exaggerated view as to how popular RE actually is. This then led me to reflect upon some of the points raised in the English Baccalaureate discussions. A datablog on the Guardian website states that RE had less uptake than history and geography at GCSE level. I'm assuming this is referring to Full Course only? http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog
    Although, my point is...when reading most discussions regarding the EngBacc, the argument that RE is popular and the other humanities profiles need raising, keeps being brought up. Is this an accurate argument. If yes, what do those of us protesting for the inclusion of RE in the EngBacc say RE is a popular subject when that is the reason it's being neglected? If it's below popularity, or equal too, then much of the opposing reasons don't make sense and are statistically inaccurate.
    RE is popular in my school, we're under-staffed and refuse loads of pupils entry to the full course each year. From what I hear, it's either the most or the least popular subject in other schools (never, for some reason, a medium-popular subject). Surely, including RE in the EngBacc will encourage schools to pay more interest in RE and ensure that it is taught well. This then will also put pressure on those who teach it poorly - I hear a lot that RE taught well is a highly valuable, important and academic subject, but due to not being a NC subject can simlarily be easily abused (e.g. too many non-specialists teaching RE).
    I've just come to realise i'm ranting a little (something my GCSE pupils are great at!) and need to sum up now. Just wondering if anyone has similar or different thoughts on this?
     
  2. ramaduds

    ramaduds New commenter

    I'd be the first to defend RE as a popular subject, but recently came across these statistics and shows I have an exaggerated view as to how popular RE actually is. This then led me to reflect upon some of the points raised in the English Baccalaureate discussions. A datablog on the Guardian website states that RE had less uptake than history and geography at GCSE level. I'm assuming this is referring to Full Course only? http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog
    Although, my point is...when reading most discussions regarding the EngBacc, the argument that RE is popular and the other humanities profiles need raising, keeps being brought up. Is this an accurate argument. If yes, what do those of us protesting for the inclusion of RE in the EngBacc say RE is a popular subject when that is the reason it's being neglected? If it's below popularity, or equal too, then much of the opposing reasons don't make sense and are statistically inaccurate.
    RE is popular in my school, we're under-staffed and refuse loads of pupils entry to the full course each year. From what I hear, it's either the most or the least popular subject in other schools (never, for some reason, a medium-popular subject). Surely, including RE in the EngBacc will encourage schools to pay more interest in RE and ensure that it is taught well. This then will also put pressure on those who teach it poorly - I hear a lot that RE taught well is a highly valuable, important and academic subject, but due to not being a NC subject can simlarily be easily abused (e.g. too many non-specialists teaching RE).
    I've just come to realise i'm ranting a little (something my GCSE pupils are great at!) and need to sum up now. Just wondering if anyone has similar or different thoughts on this?
     

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