1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Routes into journalism without an English A level

Discussion in 'Media studies' started by fluffyhandbag, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. Just a quick question, as I need to give a student some advice; ~If a student doesn't possess and English A level , therefore can't take a degree in English,.
    Can anybody advise (particularly if you're an ex journalist ) What other routes/courses a student can persue to get in to this field?

    As always, thanks in advance

     
  2. Just a quick question, as I need to give a student some advice; ~If a student doesn't possess and English A level , therefore can't take a degree in English,.
    Can anybody advise (particularly if you're an ex journalist ) What other routes/courses a student can persue to get in to this field?

    As always, thanks in advance

     
  3. On the section of the BBC website where they recruit pupils/ run training courses etc they are recruiting trainees in news/ journalism in various areas- the trainee positions that I saw were open for application from September (hope this is useful!)
     
  4. That was supposed to say 'the section... where they recruit pupils... for work experience'.
     
  5. magic surf bus

    magic surf bus Star commenter

    Keep writing stuff and submitting it independently to appropriate publications, the sooner the better.

    Another suggestion is to take one of those 'Be a writer' courses like the one offered by The Writer's Bureau. They'll encourage you to do the above, but under their guidance.
     
  6. You certainly don't need an English degreee to be a journalist, but you do need proven literacy, so any subject involving research and essay-writing is a good start. I read Politics and Economics (relevant subjects, obviously) - History and Sociology are also quite popular subjects, but journalism needs Science graduates too. I began my journalism career by joining the student newspaper, ended up with a front-page story and won a place on a one-year postgraduate broadcast journalism diploma at Cardiff. That led into a job on local radio and three years later I got my first TV experience.
    There are also journalism degrees out there, but they come with a health warning - students should be sure that they graduate with NCTJ accreditation (National Council for the Training of Journalists) as no employer will look at them without it. Bigger employers, including the BBC, offer journalism training schemes for which students need to demonstrate literacy, experience (at some level) and journalistic instinct. The BBC has a terrific 'college of journalism' website at http://www.bbc.co.uk/journalism/ which has loads of training and career info for would-be journos. Hope that helps.
     
  7. I worked as a journalist for a few years after graduating with a media degree and NCTJ qualification, then worked in PR until I trained as a teacher last year. From memory, many students on the NCTJ course were 18 and had just finished their A levels. If your student can get as much work experience as possible on a local paper/radio station this will stand them in good stead. Easier said than done I know! A lot of papers have their own training schemes (Trinity Mirror have a good one). You certainly don't need a degree.
     
  8. Thank-you to everybody who responded to my post; I'll take all of your advice on board and pass it on.
    The problem is that the pupil in question is already a Yr 14, intelligent, but lacks motivation, he writes extremely well, but has the motivation of a sloth......
    I think he's done with school and this part of the problem, but I don't want to send the lad in question to the big wlde world without something for him to think about.


     
  9. 'is' oops.........
     

Share This Page