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Risky mnemonics

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by simonc1978, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. DM

    DM New commenter

    Inspired by Professor Cox's musings on "the arrow of time" yesterday, I shall offer Vince this titbit from Groucho Marx:
    "Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."
     
  2. Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly so...
     
  3. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    If it’s good enough for Aristophanes then I’m cuckoo about it.
     
  4. I pity you more and more with each post
     
  5. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    I just cant be bothered - second time this week she has had to apologise to me and she still didint answer my question.
     
  6. Hmmm, it your question:
    Is the only problem in schools that there isn't enough discipline enforced on kids or it the only problem in schools that there isn't enough discipline enforced on kids Mike?
    And tell me. When did you stop beating your students?

    Beta - you aint pitying me babe, you're pitying the straw bunny in the corner.
     
  7. Great quote [​IMG] but I still don't think time is that simple.
     
  8. I certinly respect and enjoy your posts as I know many others do on the board. The odd one or two unable to show that level are in a minority.
    Going back to Bowland. I am still wishing it would work but it just doesnt for me.
    My findings are:
    • It excludes many many pupils in terms of 'all round ability'
    • If kids lose interest, subsequent lesson can be a nightmare
    • Many kids can't understand the idea of a long term investigation that is not explicit and hand you two lines of work after 20 minutes and cant go deeper
    • Most teachers who have done it have not been accountable to kids results or had to adhere to a SOW or have done it with really sparky kids out of hours.
    • Some kids finished after one lesson, some still keep going by the end of the week and you end up with too many kids all over the place and finding more for them to do
    • Many were underwhelmed by the end result and whol experience
    I much prefer taking the time in the holidays to write something I know the kids can dial into and suited to their level and meet outcomes with plenty of exit points if it becomes laboured.
    I here more people who dont teach champion Bowland than actually do teach.
     
  9. IMO Bowland = bowled.
     
  10. Which aspects of CPD module 1 worked for who and which didn't beta? How could that module have been improved?
    I assume you at least weren't bull headed enough to jump straight into the modules against all advice?
     
  11. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    After fortifying myself with several back-to-back episodes of “Snog, Marry, Avoid“, I attempted the first episode of his latest BBC series but, 5 minutes in, became bored after with all the snowballing superlatives. Braving the migraines induced by the glare from his shiney wooden cheeks I decided to hop through looking for instances where he wasn’t throttling the English language but to now avail; now, I could laugh off the fact that this man who’s derided philosophy would present a television programme subtitled “Destiny” and preface it with the question “Why are we here?” but I reckon the glistening savant a linguistic m0r0n I wouldn’t want as a substitute on my pub quiz team when he describes a Patagonian glacier’s movement as “seems glacially slow”.
     
  12. pipipi

    pipipi New commenter

    I agree that the glacier bit was a bit strange. I'm not totally convinced of the need to actually go and stand next to one, except that the BBC were paying, and he wanted to show something moving slowly. And I'm not sure why he had to go that desert with the ship in it, why didn't he do the sand castle thing there? All examples of time passing I realise.
    But the Chankillo hill/sundial thing was great. I had never heard of it, Stonehenge was the only example prior to that.
    but if you ask me to decide whether the BBC should give money to orange people wearing too much makeup, or to someone explaining a bit of physics. Then I would pick physics every time. Whoever is presenting it.[​IMG]
     
  13. DM

    DM New commenter

    You might think that but you would be mistaken. The American networks were paying and this is one of the reasons why the content is so overblown and hell-bent on being awe-inspiring. I too would like him to tone it down a bit and ramp up the science but if it switches people on to space in their droves, I can live with that.
     
  14. Edinburgh is already sold out. Others too?
     
  15. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    That explains a lot, that and the almost erotic regard in which the presenter holds Carl Sagan.
    I expect that "Jackass" has the same sporadic effect.
    If you&rsquo;d like to see something far more interesting and exciting, with more contingent scientific content then I recommend this BBC documentary which doesn't play language games and asks real questions that may interest children without playing the mystery card:<u><font size="2" color="#0000ff"></font></u><u><font size="2" color="#0000ff"> <u><font size="2" color="#0000ff">http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/do-we-really-need-the-moon/</font></u>
    </font></u><font size="2">The presenter, Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock, is an excellent role model to children for the enthusiasm, patience and commitment required to participate in any kind of research, having personally grinded the lenses for her first childhood telescope. In 2009 she was awarded an MBE for her services to science and education.
    </font>
     
  16. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    Deeply flawed from beginnng to end. Wittgenstein would have bonked him with a poker.
    I prefer vapid orange women to shiney pink men every time, but perhaps we were watching different programmes; when I watched the first episode of WotU I didn&rsquo;t see any physics. I saw Cox selling Cox, as is usual for Cox. The latest wheeze, as DM has pointed out, is to do so "on tour", the old Awayday game.

     
  17. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    Actually, where putative prehistoric astronomical apparatus are concerned, if we look outside our megalithic backyard then we find Knocknakilla and Callanish each likely as old as Stonehenge, although Knocknakilla probably wins by a nose. Certainly these are only two examples older than Cox&rsquo;s postcard and I would be interested in learning if the point at which he stood to observe this apparent astronomical function was in any way signified by the site&rsquo;s builders.
     
  18. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

  19. pipipi

    pipipi New commenter

    I'm not so good with Wittgenstein, so you'll have to be more basic than that. Perhaps Cox could do a program on him![​IMG]
    Thanks for the link to the film. I'm looking forward to watching it later.

    Well, being a shiny pink man myself perhaps I'm biased! But I can't believe you prefer ompalumpas to Cox (though they might have better songs). Everybody has their own presentation style, and if it is being done for USA then the director might be telling him to do things a certain way.
    (Thanks to DM for the correction about it being American.)
    No physics in the first episode? The life of our sun, red dwarfs etc and the arrow of time? Whilst some might be astronomy some of it must be physics.
    The latest wheeze? Is that the same wheeze that Simon Singh has signed onto? Or when Marcus de Sautuoy releases another (great) book to coincide with with a TV show ( i quite liked the one where he accompanied ALan Davies from QI on a mathematical journey).
    They all have to make money somehow. Some by research. Some by renting out Enigma machines. Some by TV shows. Some by writing a book or newspaper columns. I would hope that anything that boosts the profile of maths/science would be helpful, even if it's not exactly what we like. ( I still use the maths4real clips evn though they are not perfect. It might help combat some of the negativity that's out there, but that's another thread.
     
  20. pipipi

    pipipi New commenter

    Sorry Vince, badly worded by me.

    I meant that MY knowledge was that Stonehenge was the only example prior to that. And I mean of a time keeping type structure, before someone mentions the Easter Island statues. I have heard of the drawings that can only be seen from the air (can't remember the names sorry). I haven't heard of tthe two you mention, and there's probably more! Just shows what a shallow pool I paddle in (though I can still get out of my depth).
    I will have to look those two up.But if I recall the program Chankillo was used to demo how time is split up on this particular planet, and how it would be quite different on any other. There are plenty of kids in my classroom who hadn't realised this when we have talked about time in previous years. Like their weight changing from planet to planet.
    Something else from my shallow pool. Someone showed me a picture of a computer recently. Made by the Greeks I think. Could have been on QI, but I'm not sure.
     

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