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Revision Lessons

Discussion in 'Science' started by chris_uk_83, Dec 4, 2010.

  1. Hi all. I'm trying to plan some interesting revision lessons for GCSE and A-Level groups. They have their modular exams in January so I've got about 2-3 weeks of teaching time left with them, a situation I'm sure you're all familiar with!
    I need to do some revision lessons that will actually help them with their exams, and that will engage them. So far my ideas have done one or the other. I either give them past papers and tell them to get on with them, which helps them to see what will be expected of them during the exam but is boring, or I get them doing fun revision games to memorise bits of topics which ultimately doesn't prepare them for the actual exam (as you know the GCSEs at least feature very little actual content recollection these days and concentrate more on the graph skills and information gathering aspect).
    Any ideas that would help me get the pupils engaged with exam stuff would be more than welcome!
     
  2. Hi all. I'm trying to plan some interesting revision lessons for GCSE and A-Level groups. They have their modular exams in January so I've got about 2-3 weeks of teaching time left with them, a situation I'm sure you're all familiar with!
    I need to do some revision lessons that will actually help them with their exams, and that will engage them. So far my ideas have done one or the other. I either give them past papers and tell them to get on with them, which helps them to see what will be expected of them during the exam but is boring, or I get them doing fun revision games to memorise bits of topics which ultimately doesn't prepare them for the actual exam (as you know the GCSEs at least feature very little actual content recollection these days and concentrate more on the graph skills and information gathering aspect).
    Any ideas that would help me get the pupils engaged with exam stuff would be more than welcome!
     
  3. TeacherBiology

    TeacherBiology New commenter

    I am thinking along the same lines, I have 2hours lessons to fill with A2 students for Biology revision. Something that I do is stick an exam question in the middle of A3 paper and get students try to answer it for 5 mins (Depending on qyuestion) then pass to next person they add or remove bits and so on. Works ok but a bit limited.

    Really would like some better ideas.
     
  4. sadscientist

    sadscientist Occasional commenter

    This has worked well for me - have a vote. Give out pieces of scrap paper and ask everyone to flick through their textbook/notes/whatever and vote (anonymous) for up to three topics they are not confident about or don't feel they understand. Collect in and count up - select the most (least?) popular and do a focussed revision session on them. (I expect you could predict the results - but it does seem to give them a bit of "ownership" about revision)
     
  5. Just as a further to the previous post, I'm also being inspected at the same time so I need to tick all the boxes! [​IMG] panic!
     
  6. Try using 'on tour' with your exam questions: (I have done this with 6th form where the group size is generally smaller) copy a selection of the exam questions onto A3 paper and place them around the room with a different coloured marker pen at each question. Start each student at a different question and give them say 3 minutes to start an amswer. After three minutes the students move on - taking their marker pen with them. At the next question - the student looks at the response so far and then either adds to or amends it in their 3 minute slot. Repeat until the questions are answered (probably after 4 or 5 students). You can then go through the answers - or any issues arising.

    What about allocating students different topics and getting them to make a loop game on the topic; or to prepare a summary.
    Get the students to write an exam style question worth 8 marks ..... allocate topics...... then swap questions and write a mark scheme; then allocate the question to a different student to do and yet another to mark.....
    I have made exam-style papers using questions (and mark-schemes) the students have written themselves....
    What about some 'made up' answers to exam questions for students to mark - make sure you include common errors - then ask the students to write guidance to help the 'student doing the paper' learn from their mistakes.
    You don't mention who is observing, but they will undoubtedly be looking for student progress
    Hope this helps....






     
  7. Thanks for your help, I'll give it a go.
    For interest, Ofsted are inspecting [​IMG]
     
  8. I was inspected last april with y12 and the questions I was asked included - how my students knew how they were progressing against their target (we have a tracking sheet in the front of their books); how I differentiated within the lesson (I demonstrated that my two potential highest achievers were working together on a particular activity);the inspector was also interested in how I demonstrated that the students had made progress in the lesson and as it was an end of topic lesson, the links to other parts of the syllabus (we had drawn a big map on the whiteboard linking the different areas of organic chemistry - and as the students had each written a bit, it showed their input as all the writing was different).
    I also nominated a student to welcome the inspector and to point out to him where we were on the lesson plan - he then spoke to this student (amongst others) - I chose carefully!
    Good Luck!

     
  9. To some extent, the best practice at this stage is to do loads of exam paper questions but I understand where the OP is coming from.
    One idea I often use is to take in a roll of blank wallpaper (lining paper) and get them to make a giant mural of all the information from a topic or module. As a team, they get to argue about how best to portray each concept. As well as revisiting all the topics (again!) it also encourages them them to appreciate how much they actually know or how much they still have to sort out.
    Another is to have small groups where each member takes one topic. They have to learn enough about it to be able to speak for five minutes. They make their little presentations in a pretty straightforward way, challenging each other over disagreements etc and then the evil bit is that all members of the group have to face each other and talk at each other simultaneously. Apart from being very chaotic, it really focusses the mind of each speaker on their own topic.
     
  10. tubidium

    tubidium New commenter

    Book a computer room then get the students to each produce a PowerPoint slide about a spec point (give then a list?).
    Save the slide as a jpeg image then get then to put them on their phones/iPods. Instant mobile flashcards :D
    Plus you have them for next year now.

    D
     
  11. I know it has been recommended on here before but your GCSE students will probably enjoy revising from the What2learn website which has sections for OCR 21st C, AQA A and general physics, biology and chemistry. Their scores will be recorded for you to monitor and it has lots of in-built rewards to keep them engaged. Try my test account (username 'sample6' and password 'sample6') to see what this looks like from a student perspective.
     
  12. Get students to write keywords around the edge of an A4 (or A3) piece of paper. Could be pre-prepared for lower ability / dyslexic etc. The students link two keywords by drawing a line and on the line explain how they are linked. Could be passed around for students to add/amend/discuss/mark. Also differentiation by outcome as there is scope for able students to go into lots of detail.
     

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