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returning to work after mat leave, 0.8 requested query regarding teaching load

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by lucy1703, May 3, 2012.

  1. i have just returned to work following my maternity leave. I am working 4 days a week so have a 0.8 timetable.
    my previous teaching load was 23 out of 30 (0.76), i am now on 21 from 24 lessons (0.87). i have 3 frees in the week and all they have done is move my teaching from my day off and compressed it into my other days.
    with regard to pay they have deducted a full day but i am teaching the same - where do i stand?
     
  2. i have just returned to work following my maternity leave. I am working 4 days a week so have a 0.8 timetable.
    my previous teaching load was 23 out of 30 (0.76), i am now on 21 from 24 lessons (0.87). i have 3 frees in the week and all they have done is move my teaching from my day off and compressed it into my other days.
    with regard to pay they have deducted a full day but i am teaching the same - where do i stand?
     
  3. So in your school you have a 30 lesson week?
    10% PPA reduction would take your standard teacher with no responsibility to 27 lessons (ouch!), it looks like you had 4 non-contacts on top of this. This might have been because they didn't have enough to fill your timetable or all techers may have had additional non-contacts at the discretion and generosity of the Head/timetabler!
    For you the week is 24 lessons and 10% PPA would be 2.4, they have rounded this up to 3 lessons PPA.
    Technically this is right I'm afraid. You don't have any legal right to additional non-contact above the statutory PPA time.
    Someone may come along and correct me but I don't think there is anything you can do.
     
  4. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    The school are correct - It seems as though your previous 'full time' timetable was light of teaching.
     
  5. frustum

    frustum Lead commenter

    The only thing I would check is what the standard loading of teachers (not NQT, not TLR)
    in your school is. If everyone else is still only teaching 23/30, then
    you could argue discrimination. But it seems more likely that you
    were unusually light last year. It's also possible that the teaching load has been
    increased for all staff.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    If other f/t teachers are still only teaching 23 or 24 out of 30 lessons, you have an argument for either having a timetable reduction on your part week (to 19 or 20 lessons) or to have your contract increased to about 0.875, with the extra paid frees/PPA being taken on the non-contact day at home.
    Speak to a range of teachers who are full-time and do not have extra time off for HOD/HOY duties etc so that you know your facts before raising this with the school. If you are getting nowhere, you will need to involve your union.
    If there are full timers who teach 26 lessons or more out of the maximum 30, you have no case and it will mean that the school has cut its costs by adding more teaching time to each teacher's timetable.
    That happened a lot after Rarely Cover came in. Previously teachers had unprotected frees that could be used for covering colleagues and they might be lucky and keep all/most of them. If they did have to cover a lesson, they did not actively teach it and just got on with their own planning or marking whilst the class completed worksheets in silence (or not!).
    Heads are now using those 38 hours per teacher per year, that were unprotected frees, and giving teachers an extra hour per week of contact time for which they have to plan and assess.
    Rarely Cover has not been good for supply teachers and it's been a poisoned chalice for contracted teachers, who initially celebrated not having to cover for absent colleagues except in exceptional (Rare) circumstances where there is not enough notice of the absence to have arranged a replacement.
    Secondary teachers, still have ne or more unprotected frees, in addition to protected PPA time, so Heads can still direct them to cover colleagues in those Rare circumstances , using up their unprotected time.
     

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