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Return of the Anglosphere - BBC Archive on 4

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Vince_Ulam, Dec 19, 2017.

  1. Vince_Ulam

    Vince_Ulam Star commenter

    A wonderful collection of old radio broadcasts & analyses on the theme of the possible political union of the English-speaking peoples. Listen to it here on the BBC iPlayer.

    [​IMG]

    "It used to be called "The English Speaking World," comprising Canada, New Zealand, Australia, America and a collection of smaller nations. As Britain looks around for allies and trading partners post the EU is the Anglosphere set for a comeback?

    Is there a genuine cultural and political bond between Australians, Canadians, Americans and Brits, and a handful of Commonwealth nations, or are we looking at a complex world through glasses fogged with Empire nostalgia? Has Digital Culture created a world in which the English language is once again the dominant conduit of intellectual ideas and cultural exchange? Or in a world of China and Indian power is the Anglosphere a nostalgia kick for old white men? Jonathan Powell speaks to political and diplomatic figures to explore the power of the Anglosphere in a multi centred world.
    '
    BBC.co.uk, 16th December 2017.
     
  2. chelsea2

    chelsea2 Star commenter

    I heard it earlier in the week. An interesting programme.
    As I recall, the conclusion was the world had moved on, and whatever the 'Anglosphere' may have been (and there were at least three definitions), it wasn't going to change the world today - or, perhaps more pertinently, it wasn't going to meet the needs of the UK post-Brexit.
     
  3. sadscientist

    sadscientist Established commenter

    Not just China and India.
    BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) is where it's happening in our global capitalist world. Plenty of cheap labour and untapped natural resources.
    Still, at least we're part of a larger trading bloc.
    Err, were a part of a larger trading bloc...
     
  4. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    This seems to be relevant...



    Though there is an advert embedded.
     
  5. burajda

    burajda Star commenter

    One of the successes of being in the EU was extending the anglosphere into Europe. English is the lingua franca of Europe not French or German. maybe not in the future.
    Apart from the handful of 'white' rich nations, The Commonwealth doesn't mean much on the world stage I'm afraid and our common values are more with nations like Germany, Holland and Sweden than with Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nigeria even though there may be a small percentage of English speakers in those commonwealth countries. Mpst Commonwealth nations probably already see their future with the big trade blocks, US and China rather than with a single middle sized low growth European power like us .
     
  6. burajda

    burajda Star commenter

    I wonder what the reaction from Leave voters would be to this map if it had the flags of fast growing Commonwealth nations rather than the slow growth nations ones in the original

    commonwealth.jpg
     
  7. sesame1

    sesame1 New commenter

  8. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    dont take long for remainders to start hoping...I hope it wont become yet another brexit thread...but i shall listen to the themes later/
     
  9. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    Well... listened to the whole programme this morning... interesting listen.

    Thanks Vince.
     
    Vince_Ulam likes this.
  10. Jolly_Roger1

    Jolly_Roger1 Star commenter

    As was pointed out in the programme, New Zealand and Australian farmers have still not forgiven us for unceremoniously dumping them when we joined the EEC, in 1973, so I do not think we deserve much consideration from 'down under'.

    A post-Brexit future like the Fifties, when Sunday lunchtime was New Zealand lamb, with Ardmona tinned pear-halves for 'afters', while listening to 'Two-Way Family Favourites is just deluded wishful thinking.
     

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