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Resources/ideas for autistic children

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by nc_marsden, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. nc_marsden

    nc_marsden New commenter

    Hi I'm an NQT and new to key stage 1
    In septemeber i will have a year 1 class with a child with autism!
    I have had experience with working with children and adults with autism (a special needs summer camp in America) so i know about autism but no experience working with children in a school setting.

    Just wondering if anybody had any advice?
    Key resources?
    etc etc
    Thanks x
     
  2. nc_marsden

    nc_marsden New commenter

    Hi I'm an NQT and new to key stage 1
    In septemeber i will have a year 1 class with a child with autism!
    I have had experience with working with children and adults with autism (a special needs summer camp in America) so i know about autism but no experience working with children in a school setting.

    Just wondering if anybody had any advice?
    Key resources?
    etc etc
    Thanks x
     
  3. paulmarkj

    paulmarkj New commenter

    The most important thing to remember: Every child with autism is different; their needs are different and the way they react is different.

    You have to find out what works with that particular child and what affects that child. A child with autism can be severally affected by certain sounds, certain images or particular people. They can also be motivated by different things. Finding out what upsets a child is very important.

    Having said that, there are things that many children with autism are affected by. Some tips are:

    1. Keep the classroom as clear as possible - the less stimulation the better (for children with autism, noises and visuals can be amplified). Some children with autism cope best when the walls are bare.

    2. Use simple instructions: allow the pupil time to process the information. The pupil may only process some of the basic words or focus on just a few of the words - and not necessarily the most important words".

    Make sure you have their attention by standing where they can see you. Avoid the word "Don't"

    To us, "throw the ball" and "don't throw the ball" are compete opposites, but to some pupils the word "don't" is just am ignored extra.

    Repeat instructions as necessary and don't change the wording. Eg:

    "John. Sit down" (pause) "John. Sit down" (pause) "John. Sit down"

    NOT: "John. Sit down" (pause) "Sit down, John" (pause) "John, can you please sit down"

    3. Give the pupil advances warning of what is happening next - especially when you change the routine.

    Eg: "First, we are going to take the register, then we are going to do some numeracy."

    Use visual cues, eg: symbols, so show symbol for register and numeracy.

    If you change routine, give advances warning several times (routine is the key, so make a new routine by repeating.

    4. Routines: keep to as many routines as possible, including rewards and consequences.
     
  4. paulmarkj

    paulmarkj New commenter

    All the spaces between paragraphs disappeared!
     
  5. I think the greatest thing that you need to keep in mind, is that he is a child with autism, not an autistic child.
    Children with autism can be lazy, rude and hurtful in the same way as any other child. Don't always be so quick to think 'oh it's his autism' or you will have a very hard year. Don't get sucked into arguments and disagreements with the child over your decisions, let him understand that your decision is final and that you have reached it fairly. Whilst he will probably never agree with your decisions if they aren't the same as his, he will accept that the issue is resolved with your decision. You are at the mercy of the other children in the class as to how your year will go, if they are laid back and easy going you will probably be okay. If the children are argumentative and difficult, you will probably suffer a tirade of fall outs especially after break-time and lunchtime. Write some good social stories and ensure that they are read weekly, if not daily. Good Luck!
     

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