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Resigning after only two weeks

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by megan77, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. Help! I have started my first ever job as a Teaching Assistant working 1:1 with a statemented child with learning and behavioural problems but it's not working out. I wasn't given the full story about the job when it was offered to me, and I (stupidly) accepted without really knowing what was in store (because I desperately wanted a route into teaching). I have tried to ask for help, but the three people involved in his learning don't agree with each other on what I should be doing. I feel like I'm letting the child down in the classroom and I can't see how I will ever be able to manage the behaviour and teach them.
    My confidence is at an all time low, my self esteem has vanished and it's clear to everyone that I'm failing at my job and more importantly, failing the child. I want to hand in my notice as I don't think SEN is for me, although I do still want to do teaching, I think. I feel I should resign sooner rather than later, so as not to mess the child around.
    I haven't received a contract yet so I don't know what the procedure is for resigning. Any suggestions welcome. Thanks.
     
  2. Help! I have started my first ever job as a Teaching Assistant working 1:1 with a statemented child with learning and behavioural problems but it's not working out. I wasn't given the full story about the job when it was offered to me, and I (stupidly) accepted without really knowing what was in store (because I desperately wanted a route into teaching). I have tried to ask for help, but the three people involved in his learning don't agree with each other on what I should be doing. I feel like I'm letting the child down in the classroom and I can't see how I will ever be able to manage the behaviour and teach them.
    My confidence is at an all time low, my self esteem has vanished and it's clear to everyone that I'm failing at my job and more importantly, failing the child. I want to hand in my notice as I don't think SEN is for me, although I do still want to do teaching, I think. I feel I should resign sooner rather than later, so as not to mess the child around.
    I haven't received a contract yet so I don't know what the procedure is for resigning. Any suggestions welcome. Thanks.
     
  3. Poor you, sounds awful. Don't give up at the first hurdle though. I think you should arrange for a meeting with your line manager to air your concerns. Let them know you need more support or ask to go on a course? At least try to make it to Christmas if you can. Good luck. [​IMG]
     
  4. PlymouthMaid

    PlymouthMaid Occasional commenter

    Hell0 - I am by no means an expert but I noted that you had no advice yet. I would suggest arranging to speak with your head teacher and tell her that you feel unsuited/unprepared for this role and are concerned that you are failing this child. It may well be that you have been ill prepared by the people directly responsible for planning the learning and behaviour management of this child. There is no need to drop anyone in it directly but just state how you feel.
    I expect the Head will either talk to you about when it would suit for you to leave if that is mutually agreeable or they maybe able to suggest some changes or training which may help you feel more confident and get your mojo back.
    SEN teaching can be very hard and is not for everybody so don't let it put you off your plan to train to teach.
    I hope it works out for you.
     
  5. Megan I hope you won't give up yet - could it be that the child is someone who needs time to adjust to new people? That's often the case with SEN and they need you to be ready to be accepted when they're ready to accept you, if you see what I mean!
    Very best of luck to you and I hope this works out well for you.
     
  6. I wonder. What year is your child? If they have received 1:1 support previously is the TA still there? If so talk to her/him. If it is a reception child then he/she is also still settling in. Have you asked to see the SEN file on this child? Personal targets should be on this which would help you with the child's learning. There should also be recommendations by other professionals linked with the child. Ed Psych etc.
    I have 20 years TA experience and I think working 1:1 in a classroom with such a child is possibly one of the hardest things to do. Don't be put off. You sound as if you are the right person as your only concern is the child. Talk to the head, class teacher and the SENCO. Which of them is your line manager. Never be afraid to ask for help.
    Start with managing the behaviour in the classroom. Learning will come later. Is there a 'cooling off' room. Perhaps you could ask for another TA to be your mentor.
    Please stick with it a little longer. The run up to Christmas is not the best time to start anyway.
     
  7. Hey there,

    I'm going to take a slightly different angle on this. I resigned from a post after 4 weeks- in fact i walked out. I felt like you perhaps two weeks in, and by the fourth week, with one thing or another, my job become intolerable, and my confidence was shattered as i felt inept at every turn, and isolated by colleagues. I've worked with lots of different students, PMLD, even EBD/offenders and I know it can be tough, but I feel you should follow your instincts. I felt that the students I had in this particular school were not for me, and like you, it put me off for a bit. I even decided I didn't want to do teaching, and I wouldn't want that to happen to you.
    Teaching is not just teaching. I've realised that over the years its horses for courses. I started at a school with children with very severe special needs and people there told me no way could they ever work with young offenders, but i came to look upon them with awe for being able to work with children with very severe disabilities. It's not for me, and as awful as you feel saying that, it's a learning curve. Foundation stage children are not for me. Secondary age gifted pupils are not for me. Autistic pupils are not for me. I enjoy ESOL and i enjoy EBD, although they may not be for somebody else. I'd say to just get some more experience, go with what feels right. Different kids require different personality traits, and if your gut instinct is that this is wrong for you, I don't think its suddenly going to get better.
    If you haven't been given a contract yet, then more the better. I had a contract which told me that after 4 weeks i had to give 4 weeks notice, but i never did. Legally there is no recourse if you go after two weeks. I think that if you're sure its not for you, then i would go. Working 1:1 is isolating anyway, especially for a first job, and i'd perhaps suggest that your colleagues are not what they should be. I've had some very very difficult kids in my time, but good colleagues and support make it ok. If you feel uncomfortable with your child and uncomfortable in your role and in the school, i'd say that it's time to move on. Don't let this erode your confidence further. You'll get a new job and you'll love it, and you'll look back at this and think thank god i left! x
     
  8. Hiya Megan, gosh! what a shame, I hope by now the problem has resolved itself, but just for the record my feelings are that you should walk away. Working 1:1 with a disturbed child is not a route into teaching, being the patsy between 3 professional teachers is disgraceful, what's more their line manager will be aware of their behaviour, don't bother asking them for a reference. Above all don't let anyone make you believe you are at fault -this may well constitute work-place bullying. Hummmm, the things we women have to put up with! Be strong.
     
  9. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    It's not unusual to decide that this sort of work isn't for you. I've had a few TAs leave after just a few weeks (Primary EBD) - you just don't know what the job entails until you start doing it. (I've had some stay for many years too, so it's not just me!)
    Speak to your Head Teacher
     
  10. Hi there!
    I had a tear in my eye when I read your message, as I am in exactly the same boat. I know that you posted your message almost 18 months ago, but I'd really appreciate an update from you about what happened next.
    I truly hope that everything has worked out for you.

    Julie
     
  11. Hi there!
    I had a tear in my eye when I read your message, as I am in exactly the same boat. I know that you posted your message almost 18 months ago, but I'd really appreciate an update from you about what happened next.
    I truly hope that everything has worked out for you.

    Julie

     
  12. Hi Julie,
    I know how you are feeling. I had my first day today working in an Early Years department at a local Primary School, I was unsure as to whether I wanted the job anyway because I do not want to teach children this young and I had never done any volunteer work etc. with children this young. However due to the job market I accepted it and within an hour my frame of mind was that I had made a mistake, I gave up an interview for later in the week because I had already accepted this position and wanted to give it a go. But I may be offered a couple more interviews for jobs I had previously applied for later this week and if I do I think I will probably approach the HT and inform her that I want to go for them because I do not feel that this is for me (at the moment anyway).
    Personaly I wouldn't quit without having a job to go to, I have been told any experience is good experiece (not sure how that works) and to quote another TA I met today "being paid for gaining experience is better than not being paid".
     
  13. Don't expect an easy ride with this request...
     
  14. Don't worry I know what to expect, but I wont be demanding I will just be putting my points forward (if I feel the same as I do now) and will hopefuly come to some sort of arrangement to either make my current job more enjoyable and make myself better at it or go for the interviews (potentially).
     
  15. Hi Julie

    I just sent you message. I am probably in similar situation right now? How are you now? I have been working as TA only for few weeks, still without contract... and I feel that I am completely wrong place - its primary school and I am much more made to work with children with profound learning disabilities...
    it is so hard to make decision to resign after such a short time, but reading posts here by other people, it's encouraging for me to hear that more people have similar experience, it is not just me...

    I enjoy working with children, but it is just primary school environment that I just can't stand for variety of reasons.... visited now school for children with profound disabilities, and I was so happy there and would be able to volunteer there soon and maybe in the future could find paid TA job... that is where my heart really is and I have many years of experience of working with adults and children with PMLD....

    the decision to resign from post as TA at primary school is still hard, I really connected with several children at that primary school, but there were some things that just didn't seem right in the environmetn and I got very stressed, and also physically unwell from the stress... i was asked to do some extra jobs (interpreting to families) that got me into some complicated situations and brought lots of stress...I felt I was asked to do things that were the job of welfare or inclusion officer, because of my language knowledge...but paid as TA... well, maybe I will not even get my salary now after resigning...
    My husband when seeing all my struggling, told me that I keep making it harder for me and also for children when I keep pushing myself to go there to work and creating expectations in children and deepening with children and each time I go there is another promise that I would be there for them to help them (as bi-lingual TA for children with EAL)... really hard decision....but I don't want to become too ill from stress and to be burden to my husband and daugher by being so not well and stressed...

    i am so glad to find this forum and to hear other TAs experiences. thank you for sharing your experiences and for advice.

    JB


     
  16. Hi Julie

    I just sent you message. I am probably in similar situation right now? How are you now? I have been working as TA only for few weeks, still without contract... and I feel that I am completely wrong place - its primary school and I am much more made to work with children with profound learning disabilities...
    it is so hard to make decision to resign after such a short time, but reading posts here by other people, it's encouraging for me to hear that more people have similar experience, it is not just me...

    I enjoy working with children, but it is just primary school environment that I just can't stand for variety of reasons.... visited now school for children with profound disabilities, and I was so happy there and would be able to volunteer there soon and maybe in the future could find paid TA job... that is where my heart really is and I have many years of experience of working with adults and children with PMLD....

    the decision to resign from post as TA at primary school is still hard, I really connected with several children at that primary school, but there were some things that just didn't seem right in the environmetn and I got very stressed, and also physically unwell from the stress... i was asked to do some extra jobs (interpreting to families) that got me into some complicated situations and brought lots of stress...I felt I was asked to do things that were the job of welfare or inclusion officer, because of my language knowledge...but paid as TA... well, maybe I will not even get my salary now after resigning...
    My husband when seeing all my struggling, told me that I keep making it harder for me and also for children when I keep pushing myself to go there to work and creating expectations in children and deepening with children and each time I go there is another promise that I would be there for them to help them (as bi-lingual TA for children with EAL)... really hard decision....but I don't want to become too ill from stress and to be burden to my husband and daugher by being so not well and stressed...

    i am so glad to find this forum and to hear other TAs experiences. thank you for sharing your experiences and for advice.

    JB



     
  17. I did have an offer for one interview, but it was not what I really wanted and I didn't want to be labbeled as a ship jumper (poor use of English) if I wanted to leave that after a short period, so I turned that down and hoped I would get a PE specific one that I applied for. Unfortunately I didn't so I am still at my school and looking to volunteer in a Secondary School for experience to apply for jobs over the summer.
    Having said that another job came available what I wanted, so I bit the bullet and had a chat with the Head and she was very understanding. She understood that it was an opportunity for me to work with children at Secondary level and told me she didn't have a problem with me applying. I didn't get that either though, but now the Head at my school knows my position clearly and I know her stance on it, so I'm happy enough... for now.
     

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